Germany, a Companion to German Studies

By Jethro Bithell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI

GERMAN THOUGHT

I. STRUCTURE OF GERMAN PHILOSOPHIC THOUGHT

GENERAL

THE celebrated words of Fichte in the Erste Einleitung in die Wissenschaftslehre: 'The kind of philosophy a man chooses depends upon the kind of man he is', holds good, not only for individuals, but also for peoples. A people does not 'decide' for a given line of thinking any more than an individual 'chooses' his philosophy. It is born in them:

Und keine Zeit und keine Macht zerstückelt Geprägte Form, die lebend sich entwickelt.

To use Goethe's word, this is their 'Daimon'. But a people does not merely choose a philosophy as a whole: it chooses also, according to its national character, the particular viewpoints from which it will consider that whole. Such viewpoints are: the relationship of the mind with the outer world (Epistemology, Erkenntnistheorie); relationship with the origin and the meaning of Being (Metaphysics); relationship with Nature as the creative and created Force (Natural Philosophy); relationship with the reflection of life in Art (Æsthetics); relationship with acts of willing (Ethics); relationship with the community (Philosophy of the State). Formal Logic, Psychology, and Pedagogy, being practical and auxiliary sciences, are the least affected by national bias.

Of all these sections of philosophy, metaphysics has had the stronges attraction for German thought. Not that it has neglected the others -- natural philosophy least of all; but it has often approached them in such a manner that they have been to some extent restricted, as it were, to becoming facets of the greater metaphysical crystal. This is especially true for Ethics, as treatment of this subject by Kant and even more by Fichte, Schelling, Hegel and Schopenhauer shows quite clearly. This does not mean that the practical aspect of Ethics, Moral Science, has been overlooked in German thought, but it is not one of its characteristic features. Characteristic is rather the apodictic way of the acceptance of

-406-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Germany, a Companion to German Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 578

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.