A Primer for Playgoers: An Introduction to the Understanding and Appreciation of Cinema, Stage, Television

By Edward A. Wright | Go to book overview

A Preface to Cinema and Television

The following two chapters are placed toward the end of the book not as an afterthought, but rather because cinema and television naturally follow the stage both historically and in their basic techniques.

Since 1915 the motion picture has been vastly more popular than the stage in attendance. Its popularity with the masses has never really been approached, except by radio for a few short years, and then by television since approximately 1952. Today we know that forty to seventy million Americans go to the movies weekly and that an estimated one hundred million watch television nightly. It is a matter of record that eighty-eight per cent* of our population have accepted television as a normal part of their daily lives.

These figures reveal the fact that the theatre is being more widely enjoyed today than at any other time in the entire history of the world, not even excepting Greece at the peak of her power. Indeed, it can be said that for the very first time we have a truly American theatre, reaching every segment of our citizenry, both economically and intellectually.

However, these two powerful forces, born of Art and Science, must, not only because of their age but by their very nature, borrow and constantly adapt to their own use from the vast storehouse of knowledge and experience acquired by the stage in its three thousand years of existence. They must adhere to the principles discussed in the previous pages, which are the foundation of any dramatic understanding in any medium. The techniques of the motion picture and more especially of television are essentially those of the stage. Any deviation is one of degree rather than of kind. With the background of these stage precepts in mind, let us now consider in the following chapters the motion picture and television as they are related to the stage, showing some of the differences, advantages, handicaps, problems, and requirements of these two younger areas of theatre entertainment.

____________________
*
Walter Kingson, Rome Cowgill, Ralph Levy, Broadcasting: Television and Radio ( New York: Prentice-Hall, 1955), p. 148.

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Primer for Playgoers: An Introduction to the Understanding and Appreciation of Cinema, Stage, Television
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - A Theatrical Approach 1
  • 2 - The Audience and Dramatic Criticism 32
  • 3 - The Play and the Playwright 52
  • 4 - Acting and the Actors 114
  • 5 - The Background and Technicians 146
  • 6 - Direction and the Director 173
  • A Preface to Cinema and Television 201
  • 7 - The Cinema and the Stage 202
  • 8 - Television, the Cinema, and the Stage 220
  • 9 - Summary and Retrospect 242
  • Questions for Discussion 246
  • Glossary of Theatre Terms 251
  • Index 261
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 270

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.