Philodemus and Poetry: Poetic Theory and Practice in Lucretius, Philodemus, and Horace

By Dirk Obbink | Go to book overview

12
Satire as Poetry and the Impossibility of
Metathesis in Horace's Satires

Steven Oberhelman and David Armstrong


The Text: Satires 1.4.38b-62

...agedum, pauca accipe contra. primum ego me illorum dederim quibus esse poetas38
excerpam numero; neque enim concludere versum dixeris esse satis; neque si qui scribat uti nos sermoni propiora, putes hunc esse poetam. ingenium cui sit, cui mens divinior atque os magna sonaturum, des nominis huius honorem.40

idcirco quidam comoedia necne poema esset quaesivere, quod acer spiritus ac vis nec verbis nec rebus inest, nisi quod pede certo differt sermoni, sermo merus. "at pater ardens saevit, quod meretrice nepos insanus amica45
filius uxorem grandi cum dote recuset, ebrius, ac, magnum quod dedecus, ambulet ante noctem cum facibus." numquid Pomponius istis audiret leviora, pater si viveret? ergo non satis est puris versum perscribere verbis,50
quem si dissoluas, quivis stomachetur eodem, quo personatus pacto pater. his, ego quae nunc, olim, quae scripsit Lucilius, eripias si tempora certa modosque, et quod prius ordine verbum est posterius facias, praeponens ultima primis,55
non, ut si solvas "postquam Discordia taetra Belli ferratos postis portasque refregit," invenias etiam disiecti membra poetae.60

hactenus haec: alias iustum sit necne poema63
/64

-233-

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