Philodemus and Poetry: Poetic Theory and Practice in Lucretius, Philodemus, and Horace

By Dirk Obbink | Go to book overview

General Index
abracadabra210
Academics 206
accents, in papyri 76
accusative, with δειπνίξω48 and n. 30
Achilles30
acrostics, sacred 210
action, in Homer, Iliad219
actions 182
Actium, poem on Battle of 6, 281
Acusilaus200
admonitory discourse 256
adversaries, philosophical 79
Aeneas69, 232
Aenesidemus30
aesthetics
Callimachean 146
classical 219
Aether200
Agamemnon30
agents
moral 121
tragic 121
Ahl, F. M.228-9 and n. 44
Albucius37
alchemy 210
Alcinous16-17, 30-1
Alexandria88
Alexandrian poets 228
allegory viii
of Homer95
use by Stoics25
alliteration 242
alphabet, letters of 10, 79, 83, 192, 210, 265
as analogy for atoms 192n. 10
apotropaic qualities of 210
magical qualities of 210
runic 210
ambiguity 235
American Philological Associationviii
Anacreon26
anagram 231
Anaxagoras 209
Anaximines 83
anchor 94, 184
Anderson, W. S.240
Andromenides79-80, 87-8, 90, 147, 163, 263
anger 25
animal sounds 95
Antigenes56
Antimachus261-2
Antisthenes198
Antonius, Marcus37
Apelles18, 24, 267
Apollodorus of Athens203
On Gods201
Apollodorus the Epicurean209
appearance, ϕανταϲία = 190n. 6
appropriateness 9, 125, 125, 138, 267
and character 269
and genre 269
and subject 269
of style to matter 8
Archilochus9, 27, 92, 148, 172, 261
architect, of cosmos of words 212
Ares30n. 82
aretalogies, composer of 259
Argentarius43n. 5
arguments 80
Arianthes of Argos207
Aristarchus88, 100n. 6
Aristides267
Aristo of Chios9, 12, 58-9, 64, 84, 102n. 11, 124, 134, 136, 140, 146, 149, 151, 260n. 24
Aristophanes100, 239, 242
Aristotleviii, 11, 40, 121, 134
and genre in Poetics102n. 12
as poet 3
biology of 95
De anima8
division style-content-author 259
εἰ + ̑δοϲ in 106
formal and final causes in 106
formalism of 106, 122n. 75, 133
literary criticism of 137
material and final causes in 161n. 55
Metaphysics8

-302-

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