Women Politicians and the Media

By Maria Braden | Go to book overview

Chapter 9
1992 AND ALL THAT

1992 WAS BILLED BY THE NEWS MEDIA AS THE "YEAR OF THE WOMAN" IN POLITICS. Women's time had finally come. Or had it? Perhaps headlines should have said Another Year of the Woman, reflecting the fact that this was only the latest fanfare marking record gains by women. In fact, the media had dubbed 1969 the Year of the Woman when a record number of women were elected to the House. And it happened again in 1984 and in 1988. 1990 was proclaimed the Year of the Woman until women candidates began to look vulnerable and the Year fizzled out before election day. In reality, despite the familiar media proclamations, women politicians remained outsiders in 1992.

Redistricting, retirements, and other factors created a record eighty-six open House seats. By and large, women who won election did not have to run against incumbents. Only four of the twenty-four freshmen women in Congress defeated incumbents, two of them in the Democratic primaries in their states and two in the general election. For other women who challenged entrenched officeholders, the "Year of the Woman" proved to be an empty phrase. Despite the strong anti-incumbent sentiment in the country, many incumbents, fortified with seniority, media attention, and money, survived the challenge. As some observers later said, 1992 should not have been labeled the Year of the Woman at all but rather the Year of Opportunity.

Catherine Manegold of the New York Times provided a reality check a couple of weeks before the general election. "Even a wave of victories by female candidates will not give women dominance on Capitol Hill," she wrote. "Should a female candidate win in every possible race, the 103rd Congress would still be 80 percent male. More likely, many women will lose, leaving the United States still well behind most European countries in female representation." Said Gloria Steinem, "This isn't the Year of the Woman. That won't happen until we have half the U.S. Congress and every other decision-making body, a president once in a while, women leaders who are as diverse as we are." Even after a wave of primary victories for women that included Carol Moseley-Braun's upset of Al Dixon for an Illinois Senate seat and good turnouts of women voters in other early contests, Harriett Woods, president of the

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women Politicians and the Media
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.