Representative Plays by American Dramatists

By Montrose J. Moses | Go to book overview

Representative Plays by American Dramatists

Edited, with an Introduction to Each Play By MONTROSE J. MOSES

1765-1819

Illustrated with Portraits, and Original Title-Pages

New York E.P. Dutton & Company 1918

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Representative Plays by American Dramatists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Table of Contents *
  • Introduction 1
  • Bibliography of General Works 11
  • Individual Bibliographies for Plays 15
  • The Prince of Parthia - A Tragedy 19
  • Thomas Godfrey, Jr. (1736-1763) 21
  • Advertisement 27
  • Dramatis PersonÆ 28
  • Act I 29
  • Scene Ii. Vardanes and Lysias. 34
  • Scene Iii. Queen and Edessa. 37
  • Scene V 43
  • Act II 46
  • Scene Ii. Vardanes and Lysias. 47
  • Scene III 48
  • Scene IV 53
  • Scene VII 53
  • Scene VIII 56
  • Act III 62
  • Scene III 62
  • Scene IV 66
  • Scene VI 66
  • Scene VII 71
  • Scene IX 75
  • Act IV 80
  • Scene II 81
  • Scene IV 83
  • Sciene V. 85
  • Scene VI 87
  • Scene VII 93
  • Scene II 95
  • Scene III 100
  • Scene V 102
  • Scene VI 103
  • Scene IX 103
  • Scene (the Last) 105
  • Ponteach 109
  • Act I 117
  • Scene Iii. an English Fort. 126
  • Act II 129
  • Scene Ii. Ponteach's Cabin. 138
  • Act III 153
  • Scene Iii. an Indian Senate-House. 159
  • Act IV 172
  • Scene Iii. Indian Senate-House. 174
  • Act V 183
  • Scene Ii. the Senate-House. 191
  • Scene Iii. the Grove, with the Dead Bodies; Tenesco Pointing Chekitan to Them. 195
  • Scene IV 198
  • Scene. V. Senate-House. 206
  • The Group 209
  • Prologue 221
  • Dramatis PersonÆ 222
  • Act I 223
  • The Battle of Bunkers-Hill 233
  • Prologue To The Battle Of Bunkers-Hill 245
  • Act I 247
  • Scene I. Boston. 254
  • Act V 256
  • Scene Ii. Bunkers-Hill. 257
  • Scene Iii. Boston. 258
  • Scene IV 259
  • Scene V. Charles-Town. 260
  • Scene Vi. Bunkers-Hill. 261
  • Scene Viii. Bunkers-Hill. 262
  • Scene X and Last. Bunkers-Hill. 263
  • Epilogue 267
  • An Ode 269
  • A Speech 273
  • A Military Song 275
  • The Fall Of British Tyranny 277
  • John Leacock 279
  • The Dedication 285
  • The Preface 287
  • The Goddess of Liberty 288
  • The Prologue 289
  • Dramatis PersonǢ 290
  • Act I 291
  • Scene Iii. Lord Paramount [solus]. 292
  • Scene IV 296
  • Scene V 297
  • Act II 303
  • Act III 309
  • Scene Iii. in a Street in Boston. 310
  • Scene Iv. in Boston, While the Regulars Were Flying From Lexington. 312
  • Scene V. Lord Boston and Guards on a Hill in Boston, That Overlooks Charlestown. 314
  • Scene Vi. Roger and Dick, Two Shepherds Near Lexington, After The Defeat and Flight of the Regulars. 316
  • Scene Vii. in a Chamber, Near Boston, the Morning After The Battle of Bunkers-Hill. 317
  • Act IV 324
  • Scene Iii. Lord Kidnapper Returns to His State-Room; The Boatswain Comes on Deck and Pipes. 330
  • Scene Ii. a Dungeon. 340
  • Scene Iii. in the Camp at Cambridge. 342
  • Scene IV 343
  • The Epilogue. 350
  • The Politician Out-Witted 351
  • Samuel Low - (b. December 12, 1765) 353
  • Dramatis PersonÆ 357
  • Act I 359
  • Scene Iii. Mr. Friendly's House. 363
  • Act II 367
  • Scene Ii. Old Loveyet's House. 375
  • Act III 382
  • Scene Ii. a Street. 383
  • Scene Iii. Mr. Friendly's House. 385
  • Scene Iv. Another Part of Mr. Frikndly's House. - Worthnought, Discovered Solus 386
  • Act IV 389
  • Scene Ii. a Street. 397
  • Scene Iii. Herald's House. 404
  • Scene Iv. Old Loveyet's House. - Old Loveyet Discovered Solus. 410
  • Scene Ii. Mr. Friendly's House. 412
  • Scene Iii. a Street. 413
  • Scene Iv. the Street Before Maria's House. 419
  • Scene V. a Room in Maria's House. 421
  • Scene Vii. Trueman's House. 422
  • The Contrast 431
  • Advertisement 443
  • Prologue 444
  • Act 1. 447
  • Act II 452
  • Scene Ii. the Mall. 456
  • Act III 464
  • Scene Ii. the Mall. 469
  • Act IV 482
  • Act V 488
  • Scene Ii. Charlotte's Apartment. 490
  • AndrÉ 499
  • Preface 508
  • Prologue 511
  • Characters 512
  • Act I 513
  • Scene, the General's Quarters. 528
  • Act III 530
  • Scene, a Village. 532
  • Act IV 541
  • Scene, the Prison. 549
  • Act V 555
  • Scene, the Prison. 557
  • Scene, the Encampment. 559
  • The Indian Princess 565
  • James Nelson Barker (1784-1858) 567
  • Preface 575
  • Act I 579
  • Scene Iii. Werocotnoco, the Royal Village of Powhatan. Indian Girls Arranging Ornaments for a Bridal Dress. Music. 580
  • Scene Iv. a Forest. Smith Enters, Bewildered in Its Mazes. Music, Expressive of His Situation. 586
  • Act II 593
  • Scene Iii. Werocomoco. 604
  • Scene Ii. a Grove. 606
  • Scene Iv. at Werocomoco; Banquet. Smith, Rolfe, Percy, Nantaquas, Powhatan, &c., Seated. Grimosco, Miami and A Number of Indians Attending. 624
  • She Would Be a Soldier 629
  • Preface 640
  • Act I 643
  • Scene Iii. a Camp. a Row of Tents in the Rear with Camp Flags At Equal Distances; on the Right Wing is a Neat Marquee, and Directly Opposite to It Another. Sentinels on Duty at Each Marquee. 653
  • Act II 654
  • Scene Ii. the American Camp at Daybreak. the Drum And Fife Plays the Reveille. Sentinels on Duty Before the Tents. 657
  • Scene Iii. Another Part of the Camp. 665
  • Scene V. Another Part of the Prison. 666
  • Scene Ii. a Prison. 676
  • Scene Iii. Before the Tent. 677
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