Reminiscences of the Civil War

By John B. Gordon | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV
CHICKAMAUGA

One of the bloodiest battles of modern times -- Comparison with other great battles of the world -- Movements of both armies before the collision -- A bird's-eye view -- The night after the battle -- General Thomas's brave stand -- How the assault of Longstreet's wing was made -- Both sides claim a victory.

REARED from childhood to maturity in North Georgia, I have been for fifty years familiar with that historic locality traversed by the little river Chickamauga, which has given its name to one of the bloodiest battles of modern times. Not many years after the Cherokee Indians had been transferred to their now Western home from what was known as Cherokee Georgia, my father removed to that portion of the State. Here were still the fresh relies of the redskin warriors, who had fished in Chickamauga's waters and shot the deer as they browsed in herds along its banks. Every locality now made memorable by that stupendous struggle between the Confederate and Union armies was impressed upon my boyish memory by the legends which associated them with deeds of Indian braves. One of the most prominent features of the field was the old Ross House, built of hewn logs, and formerly the home of Ross, a noted and fairly well-educated Cherokee chief. In this old building I had often slept at night on my youthful journeyings with my father through that sparsely settled region. Snodgrass Hill,

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