Capital Punishment: A World View

By James Avery Joyce | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
The United Nations and the Right to Stay Alive

"Every human being has the inherent right to life. This right shall be protected by law. No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his life."--Article 6 of Draft Covenant on Civil and Political Rights

SOONER OR LATER CAPITAL PUNISHMENT WAS BOUND TO BECOME a major issue at the United Nations. And this for three main reasons: firstly, the U.N. is increasingly involved in the definition and protection of human rights; secondly, the prevention and treatment of crime, as such, have been a definite part of the U.N.'s social program from the start, and its Social Defense Section has already been responsible for promoting and co-ordinating some valuable penological reform measures; thirdly, the basic principles of the U.N. Charter are so obviously aimed at stopping men from killing other men that judicial murder, carried out by states against their own citizens, could not long be ignored in working out the legal implications of the U.N.'s basic philosophy. Running through the heated discussions on New York's East River-whatever may be the subject under debate--is the constant refrain: How can we replace the lex talionis, an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth, by a higher law, so that the human race can survive at all?

The purpose of this chapter, therefore, will be to trace the steps by which Capital Punishment gradually forced its way to the surface of the world's chief forum and, in 1960, became a vital landmark in the growth of world law by being included for the first time in the

-194-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Capital Punishment: A World View
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 290

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.