Christianity and the Renaissance: Image and Religious Imagination in the Quattrocento

By Timothy Verdon; John Henderson | Go to book overview
tian Mysteries in Renaissance art," now in preparation. For other aspects of meaning in this work, see Ursula Schlegel, "Observations on Masaccio's Trinity Fresco in Sta. Maria Novella," Art Bulletin 45 ( 1963): 19-33; John Coolidge, "Further Observations of Masaccio's Trinity," Art Bulletin 48 ( 1966): 85-89; Otto von Simson, "Uber die Bedeutung von Masaccios Trinittsfresko in Sta. Maria Novella," Jahrbuch de Berliner Museen 8 ( 1966): 119-59; Charles Dempsey, "Masaccio's Trinity: Altarpiece or Tomb," Art Bulletin 54 ( 1972): 279-81; Carlo Del Bravo, "Nicchia con crocefisso e statue," in Essays Presented to Myron P. Gilmore, ed. Sergio Bertelli and Gloria Ramakus , 2 vols. ( Florence: Nuova Italia, 1978), 2:131-32; E. Hertlein, Masaccios Trinitt: Kunst, Geschichte und Politik der Frrenrennaissance in Florenz ( Florence: Biblioteca Tascabile, Studi d'Arte, 1979); Rona Goffen, "Masaccio's Trinity and the Letter to the Hebrews," Memorie domenicane, n.s. 11 ( 1980): 489-504; Ralph Lieberman, "Brunelleschi and Massaccio in Sta. Maria Novella," Memorie domenicane, n.s. 12 ( 1981): 127-39; Philipp Fehl, "The Naked Christ in Sta. Maria Novella in Florence," Storia dell'arte 45 ( 1982): 161-64. More generally, for the Trinity and for Masaccio's oeuvre, see Luciano Berti, Masaccio ( Milan: Istituto editoriale italiano, 1964).
40.
See, for example, Blessed Guerric of Igny: "She who glories in having borne the only begotton of the Father, embraces that same only-begotten of hers in all his members . . . she herself, like the Church of which she is the type, is a mother of all who are reborn to life" ( Sermo 47:2-4, in Migne, Patrologia latina, 185:188-89; English from The Divine Office, 1:254*).
41.
This "social" reading of the mystery of the Trinity is clear in the thought of Richard of St. Victor, the twelfth-century theologian who posited love as the perfection of the divine nature and -- by analogy with human love -- concluded that there must necessarily be three in the Godhead: one to love, a second to be loved and to return love, and a third to share the love of these two. For he argues, the love of two persons for one another would not yet be perfect, unless each was ready to share his or her love with still a third person. That is to say, the lover's love for the beloved is so secure that he or she can tolerate without fear or jealousy a "rival" for the love of the beloved. See Joseph A. Bracken, S.J., What Are They Saying About the Trinity ( Youngstown, Ohio: Paulist Press, 1979), 18.
42.
For the original text, see Vitruvius, The Ten Books on Architecture, trans. Morris H. Morgan ( New York: Dover, 1960), 72-75 (bk. 3, chap. 1). Leonardo da Vinci's adaptation of this text is found in Jean Paul Richer, The Literary Works of Leanardo da Vinci ( London, 1883), no. 343. On the significance of these ideas for the Renaissance generally, see Rudolph Wittkower , Architectural Principles in the Age Humanism ( London: Tiranti, 1952). See also Henry Millon, "The Architectural Theory of Francesco di Giorgio," in Renaissance Art, ed. Creighton Gilbert ( New York: Harper and Row, 1970), 146-47.
43.
Giovanni Pico della Mirandola, Heptaplus; see Eugenio Garin, ed., Opere di Pico della Mirandola, 3 vols. ( Florence: Vallecchi, 1942, 1946, 1952), 1:220. The Rnglish translation is from Trinkaus, Image and Likeness, 2:508-9.

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