Cicero of Arpinum: A Political and Literary Biography Being a Contribution to the History of Ancient Civilization and a Guide to the Study of Cicero's Writings

By E. G. Sihler | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
CICERO A SUBJECT OF THE REGENT

CICERO arrived in Brundisium early in November by the calendar, about September 2nd by the solar year. He expected to meet Caesar there. But the latter then was at Alexandria, and the Pompeians had gone to Africa to consolidate their forces with those of Juba, king of Numidia. Cicero did not desire Terentia to come down1 there: "I do not see what you could avail, if you came." Atticus at first was quite astonished and puzzled at the suddenness of this step of his distinguished and unfortunate friend. Atticus in fact felt it as a disabling blow, which for the time being disconcerted the plans which Atticus had made to protect Cicero's interests. For Atticus had suggested that Cicero make his way north in a kind of incognito, passing through the towns by night. Caesar's old servitor Vatinius was now governor of Brundisium. -- There was a breach with his brother Quintus, now very deep, probably begun by the younger Quintus, now a declared Caesarean. Both were to go east to make their peace with the victor. Quintus and his son went separately. Some one saw young Quintus at Samos and his father at Sikyon.2 Atticus soon began to see that Cicero's procedure was correct. (Att. 11, 6, 1.) The latter, albeit then not assured of his civil rights, or even of his personal security, was glad to be away from the Pompeian arms and armaments, from the design to starve out Italy, all of which, together with the alliances with the Eastern potentates, were keenly distasteful to Cicero. He had in Epirus noticed plans for proscribing Caesar's partisans, which were to exceed those of Sulla. The victims were to be destroyed by entire classes (generatim). There was to be confiscation of the property of the wealthy men who had not followed Pompey to the East. At this time, in the waning year of Pharsalus, he expected to be summoned.3 By whom? Surely by Caesar, or Caesar's representatives, like

____________________
Fam. 14, 12.
Att. 11, 7, 7.
3
Att. 11, 6, 2. In oppido aliquo mallem resedisse, quoad arcesserer.

-326-

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