The Letters of John Fiske

By Ethel F. Fisk ; John Fiske | Go to book overview

III

Petersham, Mass., September 15, 1861.

Dear Mother:

You will open your eyes at the above statement of my locality but I will explain by telling you about Abby Morgan Brooks, although it is a long story for a letter, and I could give you a better idea if I could see you and tell you verbally.

Last March Abby came to Cambridge and to Miss Upham's to stay with her brother James, who had graduated from the Harvard Law School in 1858 and was living at Miss Upham's while practicing law in Boston. I used to see Abby sometimes in the hall at Miss Upham's as we were passing in and out; and I used to meet her in the street and think her very beautiful, but I never thought of getting introduced to her—that never occurred to met The meeting came about however on June 11th. After tea I took my pipe down to the corner of the verandah and sat there watching the drill on the Delta, in which Abby's brother James and Charles W. Eliot were engaged. Presently Abby came out at the front door in a blue silk dress, followed by Mrs. Wood the housekeeper. Mrs. Wood came and asked me if I wouldn't like to meet Miss Brooks and after introducing me to her, left us to have a nice chat. I was in love with Abby in less than five minutes and thought to myself what a fool I have been not to have arranged an introduction before! and what a nice time I shall have now till the end of the term! Fancy my consternation when Abby said she was going home next day. But we had a grand talk and her sister Martha joined us so I met her too. Abby was extremely gracious and bid me a very kind goodbye.

A description of Abby would regularly come next. She is of medium height, has rich dark brown curls, deep blue eyes, very blue, ever so blue, and very fair complexion. Her smile defies all powers of speech! Her face changes expression constantly so she cannot be well daguerreotyped. She is queenly, very stately in her carriage, not girlish, but very affable in conversation. She is refined and lady‐ like; puts me in mind of no one so much as of you. Her family

-67-

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