The Letters of John Fiske

By Ethel F. Fisk ; John Fiske | Go to book overview

XVII

217 Summit Avenue,
St. Paul, Minn.
March 24, 1892.

Dear Abby:

Am just settled down bag and baggage, at Colonel Newport's. He is in England on business. Mrs. Newport is fair, plump and fifty. The elder son is perhaps 28 and very nice. The younger is 14 with red hair, and loves to make and rig ships, and is a little dear. Miss Newport may be 24. She is a Farmington School girl. She is rather distinguished in appearance with hair and complexion very fair like Rose Hawthorne Lathrop, and one of the most exquisite mouths the Lord ever made, such lips and teeth and such a smile one rarely sees. It is a very charming family. The house is extremely pretty, slick as a pin all over. Beautiful house-keeping, well-bred servants and delicious cooking. Everything has an air of quiet refinement. The house is on top of a big bluff; the window where I am now sitting overlooks the kingdoms of the earth, including a goodly stretch of the Mississippi river. St. Paul is a beautiful city.

Last night I went to Minneapolis. Dined and passed the night, at Mrs. Garland's. Had an audience of not less than 1500 in the evening to hear "Discovery of America" extempore. This lecture given without notes is a great hit; I am practicing it before big audiences with immense success, and I like it much. It is a great relief to have the old desk out of the way, and nothing between me and the people. I talked an hour and fifty minutes, not a soul went out. There was not one vacant seat in the house.

Freeman's death is simply awful, Abby. The news came on the 22d. Nothing has hit me so hard for a great while. Our greatest master in history, almost the greatest that ever lived! Have written to Fred Macmillan.

-592-

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The Letters of John Fiske
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Letters of John Fiske *
  • Illustrations *
  • I 1
  • II 35
  • III 67
  • IV 132
  • V 143
  • VI 194
  • VII 224
  • VIII 333
  • IX 380
  • X 416
  • XI 435
  • XII 449
  • XIII 482
  • XIV 501
  • XV 536
  • XVI 549
  • XVII 592
  • XVIII 610
  • XIX 627
  • XX 646
  • XXI 666
  • XXII 696
  • XXIII 704
  • Addenda 706
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