The Letters of John Fiske

By Ethel F. Fisk ; John Fiske | Go to book overview

XIX

Cambridge, January 15, 1894.

Dear Martha:

Irving and Terry are playing in Boston now, and, as usual, Irving sent me tickets for the opening night, Jan. 13. Took Abby, Maud and Ethel to see them in "King Henry VIII". On reaching the theatre I was met by Irving's manager Bram Stoker who said:

" Fiske, I have a special message for you from Lord Tennyson. I was visiting him in 1892 at Farringford, Isle of Wight. Whilst we were talking after dinner I happened to mention something in your volume on 'American Political Ideas'. Tennyson then enquired in a very interested way: 'Do you know John Fiske?'

"I answered that you were an old and dear friend of mine. He then said: 'When you see John Fiske, will you tell him, from me, that I thank him most heartily and truly for all the pleasure and profit his books have been to me?'

"I then said, 'I shall write to him tomorrow, and tell him what you have said, and I know it will be a great delight to him.'

"He answered quickly: 'No! Don't write. Wait till you see him and then tell him direct from me, through you, how much I feel indebted to him.' "

I was, of course, deeply gratified and went after Abby and the girls who had gone ahead into the theatre and brought them back to have Stoker repeat the message.

122 East 19th St., New York,
February 2, 1894.

Dear Abby:

How do you suppose a chap is going to write letters when he has not yet finished that abominable schoolbook? Am working enough to kill a 1000-hoss-power engine. Gosh! the biggest drive I ever was in before was vacant leisure compared to this.

Am full blast on my Hartford course; have lectured there twice to lovely audiences; and have twice been lulled by the sound of the

-627-

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The Letters of John Fiske
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Letters of John Fiske *
  • Illustrations *
  • I 1
  • II 35
  • III 67
  • IV 132
  • V 143
  • VI 194
  • VII 224
  • VIII 333
  • IX 380
  • X 416
  • XI 435
  • XII 449
  • XIII 482
  • XIV 501
  • XV 536
  • XVI 549
  • XVII 592
  • XVIII 610
  • XIX 627
  • XX 646
  • XXI 666
  • XXII 696
  • XXIII 704
  • Addenda 706
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