The Letters of John Fiske

By Ethel F. Fisk ; John Fiske | Go to book overview

XX

University of Virginia,
Charlottesville, Va.
October 26, 1895.

Dear Abby:

Came with my bags straight to Prof. Tuttle's enchanting house, on my arrival in Charlottesville yesterday afternoon. After a most delicious evening meal, not like either dinner or supper, I gave "Charles Lee" lecture at University of Virginia and there was a delightful reception afterwards, met lots of charming people. Am getting on beautifully with the ex-rebels; a politer and more cordial set you never saw. They read my books here as much as anywhere, and the students at the University think I am a "great lion." Dr. William M. Thornton, Chairman of the Faculty, has this year assumed the duties of President of the University.

It's dusty, sunny and hot. Am now going to drive with Mrs. Tuttle and Prof. and Mrs. Sedgwick of Boston to Thomas Jefferson's home Monticello. Just think, this house of Prof. Tuttle's in which I slept last night was planned by Jefferson! Every spot here is historic; I must come again.

The Tuttles are perfectly delightful. Mrs. Sedgwick was Miss Rice of Stamford.

Cambridge, December 31, 1895.

Dear Mother:

Too bad you were unable to accompany Abby, Ethel and me to‐ day for the Mary Gould-Albert Thorndike wedding at Appleton Chapel; it was a very pretty affair.

If you have the silver platter you spoke of for Abby, easily available, could you send it to us, if not convenient, no matter. It is, as Mr. Toots says, of no consequence, thankee.

-646-

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The Letters of John Fiske
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Letters of John Fiske *
  • Illustrations *
  • I 1
  • II 35
  • III 67
  • IV 132
  • V 143
  • VI 194
  • VII 224
  • VIII 333
  • IX 380
  • X 416
  • XI 435
  • XII 449
  • XIII 482
  • XIV 501
  • XV 536
  • XVI 549
  • XVII 592
  • XVIII 610
  • XIX 627
  • XX 646
  • XXI 666
  • XXII 696
  • XXIII 704
  • Addenda 706
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