105 Greatest Living Authors Present the World's Best Stories, Humor, Drama, Biography, History, Essays, Poetry

By Whit Burnett | Go to book overview

UPTON SINCLAIR

The most widely quoted statement I have made in a long lifetime
was that concerning The Jungle, that "I aimed at the public's heart
and by accident I hit it in the stomach." And here is the head of
that arrow I shot,--the account of the pigs and their sad fate--
which all the anthologists pick out and which apparently the public
still wants to read. When it first came out, the deadly respectable

New York Evening Postcalled the paragraph about God and the
pigs "nauseous hogswash." See what you think of it!

UPTON SINCLAIR


The Hog Squeal of the Universe

"THEY don't waste anything here," said the guide, and then he laughed and added a witticism, which he was pleased that his unsophisticated friends should take to be his own: "They use everything about the hog except the squeal." In front of Brown's General Office building there grows a tiny plot of grass, and this, you may learn, is the only bit of green thing in Packingtown; likewise this jest about the hog and his squeal, the stock in trade of all the guides, is the one gleam of humor that you will find there.

After they had seen enough of the pens, the party went up the street, to the mass of buildings which occupy the centre of the yards. These buildings, made of brick and stained with innumerable layers of Packingtown smoke, were painted all over with advertising signs, from which the visitor realized suddenly that he had come to the home of many of the torments of his life. It was here that they made those products with the wonders of which they pestered him so--by placards that defaced the landscape when he travelled, and by staring advertisements in the newspapers and magazines--by silly little jingles that he could not get out of his mind, and gaudy pictures that lurked for him around every street corner. Here was where they

-196-

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105 Greatest Living Authors Present the World's Best Stories, Humor, Drama, Biography, History, Essays, Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • A Foreword in the Form of a Report xi
  • I The Americas 1
  • Eugene O'Neill 3
  • Ernest Hemingway 16
  • Sinclair Lewis 38
  • Robert Frost 52
  • John Steinbeck 61
  • Carl Sandburg 77
  • Edna St. Vincent Millay 98
  • Thornton Wilder 104
  • John Dewey 111
  • John Dos Passos 124
  • Pearl Buck 131
  • Van Wyck Brooks 141
  • H. L. Mencken 148
  • William Faulkner 155
  • Maxwell Anderson 173
  • Edgar Lee Masters 184
  • Archibald Macleish 188
  • Upton Sinclair 196
  • Robert Sherwood 204
  • John Gunther 221
  • William Rose Benét 225
  • Carl Van Doren 228
  • Erskine Caldwell 237
  • Robinson Jeffers 248
  • James Thurber 250
  • James Branch Cabell 268
  • John P. Marquand 279
  • Vincent Sheean 309
  • William L. Shirer 314
  • Mazo De La Roche 323
  • Mariano Azuela 339
  • Gabriela Mistral 349
  • Pablo Neruda 355
  • Eduardo Mallea 368
  • II The British Isles 391
  • T. S. Eliot 393
  • Aldous Huxley 400
  • W. Somerset Maugham 420
  • John Masefield 431
  • E. M. Forster 435
  • Bertrand Russell 447
  • Walter De La Mare 457
  • V. Sackville-West 466
  • Hilaire Belloc 472
  • W. H. Auden 479
  • Julian Huxley 490
  • Noel Coward 510
  • Siegfried Sassoon 529
  • J. B. Priestley 536
  • Winston Churchill 541
  • C. E. M. Joad 556
  • Graham Greene 566
  • Arnold J. Toynbee 577
  • A. J. Cronin 587
  • Lord Dunsany 592
  • Sean O'Casey 599
  • Padraic Colum 618
  • Elizabeth Bowen 623
  • Liam O'Flaherty 634
  • III Europe 643
  • André Gide 645
  • Jules Romains 655
  • André Maurois 670
  • André Malraux 677
  • Jacques Maritain 685
  • François Mauriac 696
  • Jean Cocteau 714
  • Paul Claudel 720
  • Jean-Paul Sartre 726
  • St. John Perse 731
  • Albert Camus 736
  • Colette 747
  • Louis Aragon 750
  • Thomas Mann 757
  • Erich Remarque 797
  • Albert Schweitzer 809
  • Albert Einstein 824
  • Hermann Hesse 830
  • Sigrid Undset 841
  • Knut Hamsun 852
  • Isak Dinesen 862
  • Johannes V. Jensen 876
  • Frans Eemil Sillanpää 889
  • Halldór Laxness 898
  • Benedetto Croce 912
  • Ignazio Silone 919
  • Geroge Santayana 936
  • José Ortega Y Gasset 945
  • Salvador De Madariaga 951
  • Pio Baroja 959
  • Pierre Van Paassen 965
  • Angelos Sikelianos 971
  • Arthur Koestler 977
  • Ferenc Molnár 993
  • Ivan Bunin 1008
  • Mikhail Sholokhov 1029
  • Ilya Ehrenburg 1044
  • IV Asia China • 1059 India • 1078 1057
  • Lin Yutang 1059
  • Hu Shih 1066
  • Jawaharlal Nehru 1078
  • Sri Aurobindo 1093
  • Biographies and Bibliographies 1109
  • Acknowledgments 1160
  • Index of Authors 1181
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