105 Greatest Living Authors Present the World's Best Stories, Humor, Drama, Biography, History, Essays, Poetry

By Whit Burnett | Go to book overview

FERENC MOLNÁR

I wrote the concluding scenes of this play at an unhappy period of
my life. While writing, I tried to give free rein to my feelings of
pain and bitterness--the feelings of a deeply hurt young man of
twenty-seven, transposed into terms of the theatre
.

FERENC MOLNÁR


Liliom's Return

SCENE--In the Beyond. A whitewashed courtroom. There is a greentopped table; behind it a bench. Back center is a door with a bell over it. Next to this door is a window through which can be seen a vista of rose-tinted clouds.

Down right there is a grated iron door. Down left another door.

Two men are on the bench when the curtain rises. One is richly, the other poorly dressed.

From a great distance is heard a fanfare of trumpets playing the refrain of the thieves' song in slow, altered tempo.

Passing the window at back appear LILIOM and the TWO POLICE- MEN.

The bell rings.

An old guard enters at right. He is bald and has a long white beard. He wears the conventional police uniform.

He goes to the door at back, opens it, exchanges silent greetings with the TWO POLICEMEN and closes the door again.

LILIOM looks wonderingly around.

THE FIRST (to the old GUARD). Announce us.

(THE GUARD exits at left.)

LILIOM. Is this it?

THE SECOND. Yes, my son.

-993-

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