The Rule of the Many: Fundamental Issues in Democratic Theory

By Thomas Christiano | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Research for the book was supported by a summer stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities in 1992, the Philosophy Department of the University of Arizona, a fellowship from The Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy at the University of Arizona, and a junior sabbatical from the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences of the University of Arizona.

I would like to express my appreciation for the help and encouragement I received from friends and colleagues. My intellectual debts to Russell Hardin should be evident in every chapter of this book. Russell's ideas have provided simultaneously the basis of many of my views and many of the challenges to which I have attempted to respond, and despite many lasting disagreements on fundamental issues he has been an unfailing source of encouragement. He also gave me valuable comments on the whole of the penultimate draft. John Christman's friendship and philosophical acumen have been indispensable sources of inspiration and intellectual stimulation for me over the years. I had many provocative conversations with Allen Buchanan on the ideas of the book. David Estlund read the whole manuscript and provided an insightful and challenging set of comments. Three anonymous reviewers at Westview Press gave me thorough and very helpful comments on drafts of the manuscript. John Armstrong, Harry Brighouse, Chris Griffin, Jean Hampton, Thom Hudson, and John Schwarz generously provided me with helpful comments on individual chapters of the book. I also benefited immensely from discussions on individual chapters with Patrick Croskery, Helen Ingram, Michael Hechter, Arthur Kuflik, Julian Lamont, Deborah Mathieu, Ken O'Day, David Snow, and Robert Varady. My thanks also go to Spencer Carr at Westview Press for his generous and patient editorial supervision during the writing of this book. Mark Patterson and Dale Cooke assisted with

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