The Rule of the Many: Fundamental Issues in Democratic Theory

By Thomas Christiano | Go to book overview
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criteria for egalitarian institutions of discussion and then explores alternative institutional arrangements that can satisfy these criteria.

Parts One, Two, and Three fit together as a unit. Part One supplies the fundamental principles of democracy but suggests that their coherence is challenged when they are to be applied to the conditions of modern society. Thus conceptions of citizenship and the companion democratic institutions outlined in Parts Two and Three are necessary to provide a defense for the principles outlined in Part One. At the same time the principles of democratic equality provide guidance and support for the ideas elaborated in the rest of the book. Furthermore, Parts Two and Three are inextricably linked insofar as the conception of citizenship can only be fully supported when the other parts of the political division of labor have been outlined. We will also see that the conception of citizenship provides support and guidance in the outline of the principles for evaluating institutions discussed in Part Three.


Notes
1.
See Anthony Downs, An Economic Theory of Democracy ( New York: Harper and Row, 1957), p. 244.
2.
Downs, An Economic Theory of Democracy.

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