The Rule of the Many: Fundamental Issues in Democratic Theory

By Thomas Christiano | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
For the argument that the media are critically dependent on these associations for acquiring information, see Robert Entman, Democracy Without Citizens ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1989).
2.
See Patrick Dunleavy, Democracy, Bureaucracy, and Public Choice ( London: Harvester/Wheatsheaf, 1990), for a review of the leadership role of parties in generating and encouraging public debate and transforming the preferences of citizens.
3.
See Samuel Popkin, The Reasoning Voter ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990), for evidence that citizens actually do learn quite a bit during electoral campaigns in the United States.
4.
On the importance of party competition, see E. E. Schattschneider, The Semi-Sovereign People: A Realist's View of Democracy in America ( New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1960), and Walter Dean Burnham , The Current Crisis in American Politics ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1982).
5.
See Jane Mansbridge, "A Deliberative Theory of Interest Representation", in The Politics of Interests: Interest Groups Transformed, ed. Mark Petracca ( Boulder: Westview Press, 1992), pp. 32-57, for the concept of "competitive deliberation."
6.
See Andrew S. McFarland, "Interest Groups and the Policymaking Process: Sources of Countervailing Power in America", in The Politics of Interest, pp. 58-79, especially p. 70, for a discussion of intergroup deliberation. See also Jane Mansbridge, "A Deliberative Theory of Interest Representation".
7.
See Graham Wilson, Interest Groups: A Comparative Perspective ( Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1991), for a discussion of this role.
8.
There are many such theorists. For a sample, see Robert Dahl, A Preface to Democratic Theory ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1956), and Anthony Downs, An Economic Theory of Democracy ( New York: Harper and Row, 1957).
9.
See Joshua Cohen and Joel Rogers, "Secondary Associations and Democratic Governance", Politics and Society 20, no. 4 ( December 1992): pp. 393-472, especially pp. 423-425. See Philippe Schmitter, "Democratic Theory and Neo-Corporatist Practice", Social Research 50 ( 1989): 885-928, especially p. 900, for a discussion of the rationale for these kinds of institutions, as well as Mansbridge, "A Deliberative Theory of Interest Representation", pp. 32-57.
10.
Groups often have nonpolitical social functions as well. Unions have bargaining functions in the economy; they have the function of protecting workers from economic insecurity. Some groups are primarily concerned

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The Rule of the Many: Fundamental Issues in Democratic Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 11
  • Part One Foundations of Democracy 13
  • Chapter One - Self-Government 15
  • Chapter Two - Equality 47
  • Notes 98
  • Part Two Democracy and the Problem of the Modern State 103
  • Chapter Three - the Challenge of the Modern State to the Democratic Ideals 104
  • Notes 128
  • Chapter Four - the Economic Conception of Citizenship 131
  • Notes 159
  • Chapter Five - a Normative Conception of Citizenship 165
  • Notes 201
  • Part Three Principles and Problems of Democratic Institutions 205
  • Chapter Six - Equality and Legislative Representation 206
  • Notes 240
  • Chapter Seven - Interest Groups and Political Parties as Institutions of Deliberation 243
  • Notes 262
  • Chapter Eight Equality in the Process of Social Deliberation 265
  • Notes 295
  • Selected Bibliography 299
  • About the Book and Author 305
  • Index 307
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