The Definition of Moral Virtue

By Yves R. Simon; Vukan Kuic | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
For instance: "It was then that Thomas Aquinas did the only thing that it was possible to do: he created a new philosophy which would have staggered Aristotle had he known it, since it was no longer his philosophy but that of Thomas Aquinas." Etienne Gilson, Philosophy and Philosophical Education ( Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 1948), pp. 37-38.
2.
For instance: "And they say that virtues reciprocally follow one another, and that he who has one has all; for that the precepts of them all are common, as Chrysippus affirms in the first book of his treatise on Laws; and Apollodorus, in his Natural Philosophy, according to the ancient system; and Hecaton, in the third book of his treatise on Virtues. . . . Another doctrine of the Stoic is that there is nothing intermediate between virtue and vice; while the Peripatetics assert that there is a stage between virtue and vice, being an improvement on vice which has not yet arrived at virtue. For the Stoics say that as a stick is either straight or crooked, so a man must be either just or unjust, and cannot be more than just, or more unjust than just; and that the same rule applies to all cases." Diogenes Laertius' Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers, trans. C. D. Yonge ( London, 1853), Book VII, "The Ethics of the Stoics," LXV.
3.
See John M. Rist, Stoic Philosophy ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1969).
4.
For instance: "I have been able to take part in public office without departing one nail's breadth from myself, and to give myself to others without taking myself from myself. This fierceness and violence hinders more than it serves the performance of what we undertake, fills us with impatience toward things that come out contrary or later, and with bitterness and suspicion toward the people we deal with. We never conduct well the thing that possesses us and conducts us. . . ." Montaigne's Essays and Selected Writings, trans. and ed. Donald M. Frame ( New York: St. Martin's Press, 1963), "Of Husbanding Your Will," p. 391.

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The Definition of Moral Virtue
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor's Preface vii
  • Yves R. Simon (1903-1961) a Bio-Bibliography ix
  • 1 - Modern Substitutes for Virtue 1
  • Conclusion 15
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - Clearing Up Some Confusions 19
  • Notes 44
  • 3 - Further Necessary Distinctions 47
  • Notes 67
  • 4 - Virtue is Not Science 69
  • Notes 87
  • 5 - The Definition of Moral Virtue 91
  • Notes 119
  • 6 - The Interdependence of Virtues 125
  • Notes 131
  • Index 133
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