White's Political Dictionary

By Wilbur W. White | Go to book overview

C

C. A. A. See CIVIL AERONAUTICS AU- THORITY.

cabal. A more or less secret association of a small number of persons who have common political designs, usually in the sense of plotting against the existing regime. The name comes from the initials of the members of an unpopular ministry under Charles II--Clifford, Ashley, Buckingham, Arlington and Lauderdale.

cabinet. An advisory body to a chief executive or prime minister, composed usually of the heads of the governmental administrative departments. A prime minister is the head of his cabinet, but a president is not considered a member of his.

cabinet of barons. The aristocratic cabinet which served in Germany under the chancellorship of Franz von Papen from May 31, 1932 to November 17, 1932.

cabinet government. A form of government in which the cabinet comprises the working executive and policyforming body of the state. The members are usually members of the legislative branch and responsible thereto; that is, when they are no longer backed on votes of confidence by a majority of at least one house of the parliament they must resign.

cabinet of monocles. See CABINET OF BARONS.

Cable Act. A law of 1922 regarding United States citizenship for married women. As changed in 1930 and 1934, the rule now is that women gain nationality by naturalization and lose it by renunciation on the same basis as men, except the time for naturalization is somewhat shorter. Marriage of an American to an alien no longer has any automatic effect on a woman's citizenship.

cabotage. The right to engage in coastwise shipping. Usually a state reserves this right along its own shores to its own nationals.

cadastral survey. Land survey used as basis of taxes on land.

Cagoulards (kah-goo-LAHR). Members of a secret French organization of fascist tendencies who in 1937 were discovered planning to overthrow the government. The accomplishment of this was prevented, but such important persons were involved that the whole thing was covered up. See CROIX DE FEU.

Cairo Conference. A conference of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and General Chiang Kai-shek held in Cairo in late November, 1943. In addition to agreements on continuing the war against Japan and renouncing any territorial gains of their own, they declared in favor of taking from Japan all territories acquired since 1914.

calendar. Legislative schedule; schedule of court cases. See HOUSE CAL- ENDARS.

Calendar Wednesday. An infrequently

-46-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
White's Political Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Preface 5
  • A 9
  • C 46
  • D 83
  • G 121
  • H 130
  • K 152
  • L 161
  • M 175
  • N 191
  • O 203
  • Q 236
  • R 238
  • T 252
  • U 297
  • W. 305
  • X - Y 321
  • Z 322
  • Appendix I Charter of the United Nations 325
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 378

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.