White's Political Dictionary

By Wilbur W. White | Go to book overview

D

Dail Eireann (dawl ER-uhn). Lower house of the Irish legislative body.

Daily Worker. New York and London newspapers, both organs of the communists.

Danubia. States lying in the Danube valley. Thought by some to form a natural geographical and economic unit which should be formed into some kind of political or economic union. States usually included in such a project are Austria, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, and Romania. Czechoslovakia is also often included; Germany is usually omitted.

Danzig. A free city established by the Treaty of Versailles, the status of which was a result of a compromise between the fact that its population was predominantly German and the fact that it was at the mouth of the Vistula River and the natural seaport for much of Poland. It was under the protection of the League of Nations and its status indicated that it was in neither Germany nor Poland, but it was inside the Polish customs boundaries and Poland carried on Danzig's foreign relations. Hence Germany considered it an irredenta and the Third Reich placed its restoration to Germany high on its list of objectives. Poland received it after World War II.

D. A. R. Daughters of the American Revolution. A women's patriotic organization composed of descendents of those who participated in the American Revolution.

Dardanelles. See STRAITS. dark horse. A candidate for office who is relatively unknown or not seriously considered as a candidate until the campaign is well under way.

Darlan-Clark Accord. An agreement reached in November, 1942, between Admiral Jean François Darlan and Lieutenant General Mark Clark in preparation for the subsequent landing of American troops in North Africa. dauphin. An old French title of nobility which was apparently used by only two rulers, the dauphins of Vienne and Auvergne. The dauphinate of Vienne came to be known as the Dauphiné, and when it was acquired by the French king in 1349 a stipulation was added that his eldest son or heir presumptive should bear the title dauphin. The first royal dauphin was Charles V. The title is best known in America as referring to the Lost Dauphin, the son of Louis XVI, who is supposed to have escaped to this country during the Revolution, though there has never been any sound evidence to support the story.

Dawes Plan. The first major revision, made in 1924, of the German reparations for World War I. The plan came as a result of Germany's not paying the reparations as first laid down, with the subsequent occupation of

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