White's Political Dictionary

By Wilbur W. White | Go to book overview

L

Labor, Department of. One of the United States government executive departments. It was set up in 1913 for the purpose of promoting employment and improving working conditions and the general welfare of wageearners. From 1903-1913 it was part of the Department of Commerce and Labor.

Labor Front. The sole Nazi German economic organization of workers and employers. It was set up, after the Nazis attained power, as a substitute for former labor unions, but the employers were included. In 1935 it became an auxiliary of the Nazi party.

labor legislation. Laws regarding hours, wages, or working conditions of wage-earners.

Labor-management Relations Act, 1947. An act amending the National Labor Relations (Wagner) Act, passed after President Truman had first vetoed it on January 20, 1947. Its effect was to reduce the strength of the position of labor established by the Wagner Act. It ruled out the closed shop, permitted employers to present their views on labor relations to their employees, made strikes subject to injunction, especially where national health or safety are involved, and made labor organizations liable for suits over contracts.

Labor Party. The large British Socialist Party. In the 1945 National Elections it gained 395 of 622 seats in the House of Commons and its leader, Clement Attlee, was asked by the King to form a Government. The Labor Party was founded in 1900 by trade unions and socialist groups in order to establish a distinct Labor group in Parliament promoting legislation in the interest of Labor. Until then labor representatives were included among Liberal candidates and were called Lib-Labs. The Labor Party is based upon the British trade unions, co-operative societies and a few other associations which give it a strong financial basis. It developed gradually since the beginning of this century, became in 1922 the second strongest party in the House of Commons and formed a government in 1924, but stayed in power only for nine months. The failure of the general strike of 1926 meant a further setback. In 1929 the Labor Party became the strongest party in Parliament, but did not have an absolute majority. Its leader Ramsay MacDonald became Prime Minister. In the general elections of 1931 the party suffered a crushing defeat and split into two; Ramsay MacDonald heading the smaller group, the so-called National Labor Party, which joined with the Conservatives and National Liberals to form the new Government-coalition that was in power until the fall of Neville Chamberlain in 1940. The Labor Party entered Winston Churchill's National Government in 1940 and

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White's Political Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Preface 5
  • A 9
  • C 46
  • D 83
  • G 121
  • H 130
  • K 152
  • L 161
  • M 175
  • N 191
  • O 203
  • Q 236
  • R 238
  • T 252
  • U 297
  • W. 305
  • X - Y 321
  • Z 322
  • Appendix I Charter of the United Nations 325
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