White's Political Dictionary

By Wilbur W. White | Go to book overview

N

N.A.M. National Association of Manufacturers. The manufacturers' organization of the United States. Because of the susceptibility of manufacturing to regulation and tariff protection this organization is naturally interested in politics, and because of its great economic weight it is influential as a conservative pressure group.

Nansen passport. Passport issued under the authority of the League of Nations permitting freedom of movement for refugees after World War I. So called from the name of Fridtjof Nansen who began the League work for refugees.

Napoleonic code. A series of five legal codes drawn up by a commission of jurists under the direction of Napoleon and promulgated between 1804 and 1810. They included civil, commercial and penal codes and codes of civil and criminal procedure. They have been widely drawn upon in the codes of other continental European countries, Japan, and the states of Latin America. Also, they were the basis of the civil code of Louisiana, adopted in 1824, revised in 1870.

narrow seas. Narrow waterways about Great Britain such as Bristol Channel, the Irish Sea, and North Channel, which the British used to claim as territorial waters.

nation. A large group of people who generally form a state and who are welded together by common traditions and culture and usually by a common language. A nation regards itself and is regarded by others as distinct from other nations. Today we usually consider a nation as being identical with a state because we regard a state as being formed by the people who belong to a single nation, the so-called nation-state. Many nations, however, may form a state, particularly if the state is a federation such as Soviet Russia, which is composed of many nations: Russians, Ukrainians, White Russians, Georgians, Armenians, etc. Typical nationstates are France, Sweden, and Portugal. Switzerland is a multi-national state in which three nationalities (German, French, Italian) have been united through history into one nation. Loyalty to the nation can be distinguished from loyalty to the government in power.

nation-state. The modern state in which the state boundaries fairly well coincide with the limits of the more or less homogeneous group of inhabitants, as opposed to older empires in which there was a definite absence of such relation between boundaries and homogeneity of inhabitants. See NATION.

national. Pertaining to the whole nation. The term is used to refer to matters concerning the state, such as the national debt, national government, national legislation, national

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