White's Political Dictionary

By Wilbur W. White | Go to book overview

Q

Quadrilateral. 1. The four-sided strip of territory between the Danube and the Black Sea comprising the southern part of the Dobrudja, which Romania acquired from Bulgaria after the Second Balkan War. A large number of Bulgarians live there and Bulgaria demanded and, thanks to the Axis, regained it in 1940 and retained it in the 1946 peace treaties. 2. A fortified area based upon four fortifications or fortified cities. The two most usually referred to were Verona, Legnago, Mantua and Peschiera, which gave Austria its hold on northeastern Italy in the 19th century, and the Polish cities of Warsaw, Ivangorod, Novogeorgievsk and Brest-Litovsk in World War I.

Quadruple Alliance. The European Alliance of November 20, 1815, composed of the powers of the Holy Alliance--Austria, Prussia, and Russia--plus England. See QUINTUPLE ALLIANCE, HOLY ALLIANCE.

Quai d'Orsay. The embankment along the Seine River in Paris on which is located the French foreign ministry, hence the French foreign ministry itself.

qualified status. The position in international law of a state which is not entirely independent, as, for example a protectorate.

quarantine. 1. To detain persons or ships temporarily to prevent the spread of disease. 2. The temporary confinement of persons to a residence or part of a hospital, or of ships within a port, to prevent the spread of disease. Usually the detention lasts for a period of time or until examination indicates there appears to be no danger of contagion.

Quarantine Speech. Speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, October 5, 1937 at the opening of the Outer Drive bridge in Chicago. He pointed out that an epidemic of world lawlessness was spreading; that epidemics of disease require a quarantine to protect the community against the spread of the disease; that with the danger of war spreading, the United States would endeavor to keep out, but that there is no complete protection in a world of disorder; and that the nations' will for peace must express itself so that nations tempted to violate their agreements will desist.

"Quart of milk for every Hottentot." W. T. Witherow, president of the National Association of Manufacturers, speaking at a war conference of American industries in December, 1942 said, "I am not fighting for a quart of milk for every Hottentot . . ." He was alluding to a passage in a speech by Henry A. Wallace, then vice-president of the United States, on May 8, 1942 in which he said, "Half in fun and half seriously I said the other day to Madame Litvinov 'The object of this war is to make

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White's Political Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Preface 5
  • A 9
  • C 46
  • D 83
  • G 121
  • H 130
  • K 152
  • L 161
  • M 175
  • N 191
  • O 203
  • Q 236
  • R 238
  • T 252
  • U 297
  • W. 305
  • X - Y 321
  • Z 322
  • Appendix I Charter of the United Nations 325
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