White's Political Dictionary

By Wilbur W. White | Go to book overview

a court or administrative body which has the force of the law or order being interpreted.

"Rum, Romanism, and Rebellion." In the United States a term first used in a critical sense by Rev. S. D. Burchard to refer to the bases of the Democratic party in the campaign of 1884. In part its result was to keep many of the Irish in the Democratic Party and defeat James G. Blaine.

Runciman mission. The visit of Lord Runciman to Prague, Czechoslovakia in August and September of 1938 just prior to the Munich crisis. He was sent by Prime Minister Chamberlain ostensibly to get the facts in the situation; in reality he appeared to be sent to get the Czechs to accede to the German demands.

runoff. A second election or primary which is held because the first is not conclusive. It is usually held because of a requirement that a successful candidate should have a majority of the votes. If no one gets a majority on the first round, a second contest is held between the two highest of the first round.

Rural Electrification Administration. An agency set up May 11, 1935 and transferred to the Agriculture Department July 1, 1939. Its function is to finance rural electrification, including wiring and appliances, by self-liquidating loans.

Russo-Japanese War. The war fought in 1904-5 between Russia and Japan, chiefly in Manchuria, over the conflict of interests there. See PORTSMOUTH, TREATY OF.

Ruthenia. See CARPATHO-UKRAINE.


S

S. Senate Bill.

S. A. or Sturmabteilung. See STORM TROOPS.

Saad-Abad, Pact of. See MIDDLE EAST- ERN PACT.

Saar Territory. A small area, in western Germany before 1914, governed by the League of Nations through a commission from 1920 to 1935. The mines of the territory were given to France and the French customs frontier included the area. In 1935 a plebiscite was held as provided when the League administration was set up, offering the population the choice of staying under the League, joining France, or joining Germany. The vote favored Germany.

sabotage. 1. Interference with or prevention of production, usually thought of as industrial production, by intentionally disabling the processes of production, as for example, by rendering the machinery unfit for use. The word comes from the French word for wooden shoe, sabot, and means literally to throw a wooden shoe in the machinery. 2. To interfere with production as in 1.

saboteur. A person who carries out or tries to carry out an act of sabotage. See SABOTAGE.

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