Arthur Honegger

By Harry Halbreich; Roger Nichols | Go to book overview

APPENDLX TWO

Note on Recordings

By agreement between the author and Librairie Arthème Fayard, publisher of the original French edition of this volume, in order to ensure that this book would conform with the other books in the same series, it was decided to not provide a discography. It is no doubt true that nothing becomes dated quite as quickly as a discography, and this is particularly so in the case Honegger, especially since the arrival of the compact disc. Recently there has been a heartening increase in the number of published recordings of his music -- clearly a sign that his reputation is healthy, given that recording companies generally bring out music they expect to be able to sell.

Honegger's discography has always been large -- some works, like Pacific 2.3.1 and the Symphony for Strings, have even been recorded more than twenty times in all -- but it became much sparser during the "barren" years of the 1960 and 1970s, and many older recordings have indeed never been reissued. The large number of new recordings has only partially compensated for these gaps, and some large Honegger works that used to be available are not so any longer. Others have never had the honor of being recorded. It is to be hoped that such gaps will soon be filled.

Meanwhile, most of Honegger's major works are well represented in the catalogs. His chamber music is there complete, and his best-known oratorios, his symphonies, and his other large pieces of orchestral music are, with rare exceptions, even available in several excellent versions. Recent interpretations aside, important classic versions by artists such as Charles Miinch, Ernest Ansermet, and Herbert von Karajan have sensibly been brought out on compact disc, with an improvement in quality that is sometimes startling.

The same has been done with some of the all-too-few recordings of the composer conducting his own music. These recordings are revelations in terms of the quite amazing energy they display, and it is to be hoped that we shall soon have access to everything that survives in this field. This hope applies equally to the rare recordings of Claire Croiza's exceptional voice, both as singer and actress. They are a lesson in vocal technique, in diction, in beauty, in nobility, and in emotion. Then there is the long conversation between Honegger, Paul Claudel, and Bernard Gavoty on Jeanne d'Arc am bûcher. This is a fabulous document (what beautiful French they all speak!) and it should be reissued. There are other recordings of the same kind, which should also be brought out.

-638-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Arthur Honegger
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 677

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.