Alma Rose: Vienna to Auschwitz

By Richard Newman; Karen Kirtley | Go to book overview

6

Blood and Honor

Who feels art with his whole soul and love can never be unhappy. -- Bruno Frank

The " Nuremberg Laws for the Protection of German Blood and German Honor" were decreed in Germany on 15 September 1935. Marriages between Jews and "citizens of German or related blood" were forbidden. Any such marriages would henceforth be considered invalid, even if they took place outside Germany. Extramarital relations between Jews and non-Jews were outlawed. Jews were forbidden to employ German females under the age of fortyfive in their households and forbidden to fly the Reich flag or display the Reich colors. The new laws were announced at the Reich Party Congress of Freedom by Fiihrer and Reich Chancellor Adolf Hitler. Except for the provision regarding German household employees, they went into effect immediately.

An attachment to the laws on 14 November 1935 described a Jew as "a person descended from at least three grandparents who are full Jews by race" and defined another category of state subjects, the Mischlinge, as Jews if descended from two full Jewish grandparents, if practicing the Jewish religion at the time the Nuremberg Laws were effected, if married to a Jew at that time or subsequently, if born from an "illegal" marriage between a Reich citizen and a Jew that took place after 15 September 1935, or if born illegitimately after 31 July 1936 as the result of "illegal" extramarital intercourse with a Jew.

In a speech delivered in the Reichstag in September 1935, Hitler stressed that the new race laws were "an attempt to regulate by law [the Jewish] problem, which, should this attempt fail, must then be handed over by law to the National Socialist Party for a final solution." 1 The relentless defamation, disenfranchisement, and impoverishment of the Jews went forward in full view. By 1934 German Jews were barred from careers in civil service, public office, agriculture, theater and film, broadcasting, journalism, and stock exchanges. Signs in hotels, movie houses, and eating places, even pharmacies, groceries,

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