Alma Rose: Vienna to Auschwitz

By Richard Newman; Karen Kirtley | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1: MUSICAL ROYALTY: THE BACKGROUND

Epigraph: Pirani 1962.

1.
Letter from Bruno Walter to Alfred Rosé, 17 July 1945, now in the Mahler-Rosé Collection, the Gustav Mahler-Alfred Rosé Room, the Music Library, the University of Western Ontario, London, Canada, henceforth cited as the MahlerRosé Collection.
2.
Zweig 1944, 21.
3.
Franz Lehár ( 1870-1948), a prolific Austrian composer, was originally from Hungary.
4.
Graf 1969, 72-73.
5.
Otto Mahler, the talented youngest surviving brother, committed suicide in 1895 at the age of twenty-two. Alois, seven years younger than Gustav, was more aloof from the family and reputedly became involved in shady financial dealings. He managed the office of a candy company in Vienna then moved to the United States, where he became a baker and real estate broker. He died in 1931 in Chicago.
6.
Ferruccio Busoni ( 1866-1924), a German-Italian composer and pianist, lived in Vienna in the 1880s, where he knew Brahms and Karl Goldmark.
7.
Adrian Boult, "Arnold Rosé and the Vienna Philharmonic", Music and Letters, vol. 32, no. 33 ( July 1951): 257. Boult first made this statement in London in 1930.
8.
As a refugee in England, Arnold would reform the ensemble; thus the Rosé Quartet was a performing ensemble for over sixty years. Violinist Albert Bachrich and violist Hugo von Steiner later joined the quartet, with Reinhold Hummer on cello. The best-known group, who performed together during the first two decades of the 1900s, were Rosé as first violinist; Paul Fischer, second violinist; Anton Ruzitska, violist; and Friedrich Buxbaum, cellist. Anton Walter replaced Buxbaum on the cello in 1921. Later Buxbaum rejoined. the ensemble, and Max Handl became the violist.
9.
Emma Mahler Rosé died in 1933 in Weimar. Eduard would die in 1942 in the Theresienstadt (Terezín) ghetto. Ernest Rosé became an actor. During the Second

-329-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Alma Rose: Vienna to Auschwitz
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Preface 9
  • Editor's Note 15
  • Prologue: Alma Maria Rosé 17
  • 1 - Musical Royalty: the Background 19
  • 2 - A Fine Musical Nursery 32
  • 3 - War 42
  • 4 - Double-Edged Sword 53
  • 5 - Waltzing 69
  • 6 - Blood and Honor 84
  • 7 - Anschluss 90
  • 8 - Black Wednesday 102
  • 9 - Another Blow 115
  • 10 - The Need to Sacrifice 124
  • 11 - Rebirth 135
  • 12 - Musical Fortress 156
  • 13 - Council of War 174
  • 14 - Flight 188
  • 15 - Enter Alois Brunner 199
  • 16 - Instant Nightmare 211
  • 17 - Mandel's Mascots 226
  • 18 - The Music Block 249
  • 19 - Escape into Excellence 260
  • 20 - The Orchestra Girls 278
  • 21 - Frau Alma 287
  • 22 - Death in the Revier 298
  • 23 - Reverberations 310
  • Epilogue: Memories of Alma 325
  • Notes 329
  • Interviews and Major Sources 357
  • Bibliograpby 362
  • The Women's Orchestra of Auschwitz-Birkenau 378
  • Camp Glossary 384
  • Index 389
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 407

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.