Mystery and Method: The Other in Rahner and Levinas

By Michael Purcell | Go to book overview

to "I think." "I think" refers to the I's self-certainty as in the Cartesian project, but "I speak" is distance, dispersion, effacing of existence. It is the outside and the disappearance of the speaking subject who is less the responsible agent of discourse, but a "non-existence in whose emptiness the unending of language uninterruptedly continues" ( Foucault 1990, 11). 10

It is this clandestine companion, whose subjectivity is a constant withdrawing, whose voice we also hope to hear.


ENDNOTES
1
Quoting from Maurice Merleau-Ponty, "An Unpublished Text," Arleen B Ballery (tr.), in The Primacy of Perception, James M Edie (ed.), ( Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1964), 8-9.
2
Cf. Exercises 336, where Ignatius writes, "It belongs to God alone to give consolation without previous cause, for it belongs to the Creator to enter into the soul, to leave it, and to act upon it, drawing it wholly to the love of his Divine Majesty. I say, without previous cause, that is, without any previous perception or knowledge of any object from which such consolation might come to the soul through its own acts of intellect and will."
3
In a chapter entitled, "...That Dangerous Supplement..." in Of Grammatology, Derrida views the notion of "supplement" in Rousseau's writing as "a sort of blind spot" around which his text is organised. "In certain respects," he writes, "the theme of supplementarity is certainly no more than one theme among others. It is in a chain.... But it happens that this theme describes the chain itself.... [T]he concept of the supplement and the theory of writing designate textuality itself in Rousseau's text... ( Derrida 1976,163). The notion of the "blind spot" finds its counterpart in transcendental thinking also. Lonergan, in Insight, A Study of Human Understanding, employs the notion of scotosis for the unconscious aberration which occurs in human understanding, and the resulting blind spot a scotoma ( Lonergan 1958, 191-92).
4
One would want to argue, on the contrary, following Maurice Blanchot's question on the nature of a fragment, that the great value of Rahner's work is the scattered and fragmentary nature of so much of it, and the fact that he has turned away from an attempt at systematisation. (See Blanchot 1993, 307-14).
5
Vass, unfortunately, does not address the significance of vice-versa.
6
Rahner, "Thomas Aquinas on the Incomprehensibility of God," a lecture delivered at the University of Chicago, Nov 8, 1974.
7
Levinas distinguishes ontology and metaphysics. Ontology, "a reduction of the other to the same by the interposition of a middle and neutral

-xxxiii-

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Mystery and Method: The Other in Rahner and Levinas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Introduction xii
  • Endnotes xxxiii
  • 1. Method 1
  • 1.7 Summary 56
  • Endnotes 59
  • 2 Philosophical Origins 119
  • Endnotes 121
  • 3. Questioning Presence 129
  • 3.5 Summary 166
  • Endnotes 169
  • 4. Subjectivity and Alterity 171
  • 5. Desiring the Other Or, the Prevenience of Grace 223
  • 5-5 Summary 246
  • Endnotes 248
  • 6 the Sacramentality of the Face, Or, Sacramental Signification 251
  • Endnotes 294
  • 7. Being Ethical 297
  • Endnotes 333
  • 8 the Mystery of the Other 335
  • Endnotes 357
  • Bibliography 359
  • Index 383
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