CHAPTER II
A CITY OF ROMANCE

KHARTUM!

It is a name which many Englishmen cannot hear, even when it is prosaically called at a railway station, without a certain thrill. To some, indeed, of my fellowtravellers who arrived with me by the desert train that dark, warm evening in December, it may have meant little. 'Also sind wir zuletzt am Ende!' says the stout German, who has been grumbling and perspiring for many hours. For him, coming into the Sudan with strictly commercial aims, Khartum is only a town like any other. So it is to the American lady tourist, under the disc of a vast white felt helmet and a blue veil like a mosquito-curtain; to the good-looking young Briton, bound for Gondokoro and the pursuit of big game, it is merely the starting-point of a sporting expedition; to the bimbashi of a Sudanese battalion going back to duty after his three months' leave it means another spell of hard, hot, dusty toil before the moist greenness of 'home' can be felt again. The aliens have no part in the associations that gather round the spot where the two Niles join. The youngsters were not old enough to share in the long tension of that unavailing march which ended in futility and retreat; they were

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Egypt in Transition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Introduction vii
  • Note by the Author xxi
  • Contents xxiii
  • Egypt in Transition Chapter I - The Desert Train 1
  • Chapter II - A City of Romance 9
  • Chapter III - The Growing of Khartum 19
  • Chapter IV Omdurman 31
  • Chapter V Anglo-Sudanese Society 40
  • Chapter VI Concerning Politics and Persons 51
  • Chapter VII Some Sudanese Problems 62
  • Chapter VIII Simpkinson Bey 74
  • Chapter IX - Concerning Women, Soldiers, and Civilians 84
  • Chapter X The New Gate of Africa 93
  • Chapter XII A Nocturne 111
  • Chapter XIII A Sudan Plantation 120
  • Chapter XIV Land and Water 132
  • Chapter XV The Bridle of the Flood 141
  • Chapter XVI The Clients of Cook 153
  • Chapter XVII The Hills of the Dead 162
  • Chapter XVIII Cairo Impressions 169
  • Chapter XIX 179
  • Chapter XX Mr. Vaporopoulos 192
  • Chapter XXI - The Schools of the Prophet 202
  • Chapter XXII - The Occupation 212
  • Chapter XXIII 223
  • Chapter XXV Halting Justice 242
  • Chapter XVII Some Recent Reforms 253
  • Chapter XXVII The Drag on the Wheel 270
  • Chapter XXVIII Conclusions 286
  • Index 311
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 325

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.