Lord Durham's Report: An Abridgement of Report on the Affairs of British North America

By Lord Durham; Gerald M. Craig | Go to book overview

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY

MONDAY / FEBRUARY 6, 1865.

Hon. John Alexander Macdonald ( Attorney General West) [Kingston]:

. . . only three modes that were at all suggested, by which the dead-lock in our affairs, the anarchy we dreaded, and the evils which retarded our prosperity, could be met or averted. One was the dissolution of the union between Upper and Lower Canada, leaving them as they were before the union of 1841. I believe that that proposition, by itself had no supporters. It was felt by every one that, although it was a course that would do away with the sectional difficulties which existed, -- though it would remove the pressure on the part of the people of Upper Canada for the representation based upon population, -- and the jealousy of the people of Lower Canada lest their institutions should be attacked and prejudiced by that principle in our representation; yet it was felt by every thinking man in the province that it would be a retrograde step, which would throw back the country to nearly the same position as it occupied before the union, -- that it would lower the credit enjoyed by United Canada, -- that it would be the breaking up of the connection which had existed for nearly a quarter of a century, and, under which, although it had not been completely successful, and had not allayed altogether the local jealousies that had their root in circumstances which arose before the union, our province, as a whole, had nevertheless prospered and increased. It was felt that a dissolution of the union would have destroyed all the credit that we had gained by being a united province, and would have left us two weak and ineffective governments, instead of one powerful and united people. (Hear, hear.) The next mode suggested, was the granting of representation by population. Now, we all know the manner

-39-

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Lord Durham's Report: An Abridgement of Report on the Affairs of British North America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction i
  • Commission 13
  • British North America Report To the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty 16
  • Suggestions For Further Reading 175
  • Index 177
  • Contents *
  • Introduction i
  • The Legislative Council 19
  • The Legislative Assembly 39
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