Federalism, Finance, and Social Legislation in Canada, Australia, and the United States

By A. H. Birch | Go to book overview

1
THE PROBLEMS OUTLINED

I

THE skeleton model which is to serve as the ground of comparison in this study has a number of characteristics which must now be listed. In the first place, the government of the country must be one which is carried on within the framework of a written constitution, of which all or some clauses can be amended only by a special process prescribed in the constitution and different from the normal process of legislation. Second, there exist in this country one national and several regional governments,1 whose powers are defined by the constitution and are co-ordinate with one another. Both the national and the regional governments, that is, have authority over certain subjects of legislation, which are listed in the constitution, so that each government is independent of the other within its own sphere. Third, there is an independent tribunal to interpret the constitution, adjudicate between the national and regional governments, and declare invalid any legislation which it decides to be unconstitutional. Fourth, the division of powers between the national and regional governments is such that each government has control over certain sources of revenue, so that each may be, in principle if not in practice, financially independent of the other. Fifth, the division of powers is such that control over most of the social services is given, either specifically or as part of the residuary powers, to the regional governments.

It will be noted that this model embodies the federal prin

____________________
1
The term 'regional' is not without objection, because it has been used to cover anything from a part of a city to a part of the world. However, its use in this connexion has been established by Professor Wheare, and has the advantage that it is more easily applicable to the new federations in the West Indies and Central Africa than the terms 'provincial' or 'state' would be. For these reasons it is used here, and will also be used in the final chapter of the book, although in the intervening chapters, which deal specifically with Canada, Australia, and the United States, 'provincial' and 'state' will be used.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Federalism, Finance, and Social Legislation in Canada, Australia, and the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.