Nonmetropolitan America in Transition

By Amos H. Hawley; Sara Mills Mazie | Go to book overview

Preface
Nonmetropolitan America is in a state of transition as unanticipated and dramatic changes sweep the countryside. For the first time in many decades, these areas are attracting more people than they are losing and are growing faster than metropolitan areas. The nonmetropolitan economy and the jobs it generates are growing and diversifying. And the reach of urban institutions has extended to encompass the continent and with that nonmetropolitan areas. Many policymakers and policy analysts are not fully aware of the origins and scope of these changes. Few have the time to draw together the data and the knowledge required to gain a full appreciation of these ongoing changes.Yet, the advances in national integration indicated in these trends carry significant implications for governmental policy. With the blurring of the old urban-rural or the newer metropolitan-nonmetropolitan distinction, it would seem no longer sensible to entertain policy proposals that treat one member of the dichotomy independently of the other. It is more than likely that the needs and problems of the national society will lie on a different dimension than that recognized in the past.To examine what is known about changes taking place and their implications for both the present and the future, and to make that knowledge generally available, the assistant secretary for rural development of the U.S. Department of Agriculture established the Future of Rural America Advisory Group within the Farmers Home Administration. This group of outstanding scholars was chaired by Amos H. Hawley, Kenan Professor Emeritus of Sociology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The members of the Group, who served without compensation, were:
Dr. William Alonso Center for Population Studies Harvard University

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