and class politics resonated in colonial settings, how class and gender discriminations were transposed into racial distinctions and reverberated in the metropole as they were fortified on colonial ground. Such investigations should help show that sexual control was both an instrumental image for the body politic, a salient part standing for the whole, and itself fundamental to how racial policies were secured and how colonial projects were carried out.


Notes
1.
See, for example, Etienne and Leacock ( 1980), Hafkin and Bay ( 1976), Robertson and Klein ( 1983), and Silverblatt ( 1987). For a review of some this literature in an African context see Bozzoli ( 1983), Robertson ( 1987), and White ( 1988).
2.
This is not to suggest that there were not some women whose sojourns in the colonies allowed them to pursue career possibilities and independent lifestyles barred to them in metropolitan Europe at the time. However, the experience of professional women in South Asia and Africa highlights how quickly they were shaped into 'cultural missionaries' or, in resisting that impulse, were strongly marginalized in their work and social life (see Callaway 1987: 88-164; Ramuschack, n.d.).
3.
In subsequent work, I focus explicitly on the contrasts and commonalities in how European women and men represented and experienced the social, psychological, and sexual tensions of colonial life.
4.
See Verena Martinez-Alier Marriage, Class and Colour in Nineteenth-Century Cuba ( 1974), which subtly analyses the changing criteria by which colour was perceived and assigned. For the Netherlands Indies, see Jean Taylor ( 1983) exquisite study of the historical changes in the cultural markers of European membership from the seventeenth through the early twentieth centuries. Also see Van Marle ( 1952) detailed description of racial classification, conjugal patterns, and sexual relations for the colonial Indies.
5.
See Winthrop Jordan ( 1968: 32-40) on Elizabethan attitudes toward black African sexuality and Sander Gilman's analysis of the sexual iconography of Hottentot women in European art of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries ( 1985: 76-108). On colonial sexual imagery see Malleret ( 1934: 216-41), Tiffany and Adams ( 1985), and the bibliographic references therein. 'The Romance of the Wild Woman', according to Tiffany and Adams, expressed critical distinctions drawn between civilization and the primitive, culture and nature, and the class differences between repressed middle-class women and 'her regressively primitive antithesis, the working-class girl' ( 1985: 13).
6.
Thus in Dutch and French colonial novels of the nineteenth century, for example, heightened sensuality is the recognized reserve of Asian and Indo- European mistresses, and only of those European women born in the colonies and loosened by its moral environment ( Daum 1984; Loutfi 1971).
7.
The relationship between sexual control, racial violence, and political power has been most directly addressed by students of American Southern social history: see Jordan ( 1968), Lerner ( 1972), Dowd Hall ( 1984), and the analyses by turn-of-the-century Afro-American women intellectuals discussed in Carby

-252-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Feminism and History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 614

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.