Soviet Emigrae Artists: Life and Work in the USSR and the United States

By Marilyn Rueschemeyer; Igor Golomshtok et al. | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
Interview with Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid, May 22, 1983. Unless otherwise noted, direct quotations derive either from interviews or from written materials provided by the various artists discussed in this chapter.
2.
Janet Kennedy, "From the Real to the Surreal" and Norton Dodge, "Conceptual and Pop Art" in New Art from the Soviet Union, edited by Norton Dodge and Alison Hilton. ( Washington, D.C.: Acropolis Press, 1977). The artists involved support this observation. Igor Tulipanov, for example, says that Neizvestny's powerful abstract sculpture could not have been created by a Leningrad artist.
3.
Alexis Rannit, cited in The Stanford Daily ( August 10, 1982).
4.
Wolfgang Fischer, Mikhail Chemiakin: Transformations (Exhibition catalogue: Fischer Fine Art, London, 1980), p. 6.
5.
Mikhail Chemiakin: Interview with Playboy Magazine (typescript in the possession of artist).
6.
Statement by Rimma and Valery Gerlovin in A-Ya, No. 1 ( 1979), p. 17. AYa is a review of unofficial Russian art, covering work by emigré artists and by artists living in the Soviet Union. Its editors are Alexei Alekseev and Igor Chelkovskii; the American representative is Alexander Kosolapov.
7.
Mikhail Chemiakin and Vladimir Ivanov, "Metaphysical Synthetism: Programme of the Petersburg Group, 1974" in Igor Golomshtok and Alexander Glezer , Soviet Art in Exile, edited by Michael Scammel ( London: Secker and Warburg, 1977), p. 156.
10.
This phenomenon is well documented in recent volumes of Iskusstvo, the art journal published by the Union of Artists, and also in recent books on the younger generation of Soviet painters. See Anna Dekhtiar, Molodye zhivopistsy 70-kh godov [Young Painters of the 70s] ( Moscow: Sovetskii khudozhnik, 1979).
11.
New Art from the Soviet Union, pp. 17, 39.
12.
Komarl/Melamid: Two Soviet Dissident Artists, edited by Melvyn B. Nathanson . ( Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 1979), p. x.
13.
Ibid., pp. xvii-xviii.
14.
Jamey Gambrell, "Monumental Show' des Refusés, Gowanis Memorial Artyard," Artforum 20 ( October 1981), pp. 80-82.
15.
David K. Shipler, "Impish Artists Twit the State," The New York Times ( February 6, 1977).
16.
The syringe project, which originated with Valery, is also exhibited jointly.
17.
Variants of the Russian Samizdat show have been exhibited at the Visual Studies Workshop, Rochester, N.Y.; Chappaqua Library Gallery, Chappaqua, N.Y.; Washington Project for the Arts; Anderson Gallery, Richmond, Va.; Western Front Gallery, Vancouver; 911 East Pine Street Gallery, Seattle; and the Hewlett Gallery, Pittsburgh. The show continues to travel.

-154-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Soviet Emigrae Artists: Life and Work in the USSR and the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction: Emigrating From the Soviet Union 1
  • Notes 13
  • The History and Organization Of Artistic Life in the Soviet Union 16
  • Notes 58
  • Soviet Emigré Artists in The American Art World 60
  • Notes 117
  • The Artistic Development Of Soviet Emigré Artists in New York 121
  • Notes 154
  • Afterword 156
  • Note 161
  • Selected Bibliography 162
  • Index 165
  • About the Authors 169
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 174

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.