Dear Sister: The Civil War Letters of the Brothers Gould

By Robert F. Harris; John Niflot | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
1864: Wesley, James, Richard,
William, George

Convalescent Camp Bridgeport Ala
Jan 13th 1864 [Wednesday]

My Dear Sister Hannah,
It is through the tender mercies of our kind Father that I am still alive & enjoying myself better than I have for a long time. I am gaining quite fast. Hope I will keep on till I get as I use to be. I recieved your letter some time ago. Was very glad to hear from you too and to hear you were all well. I hope those few lines will find you all the same. I would have answered your letter before but had just written one to you, so I hope you wont think hard of me for not writing before. There aint much news here, so if I don't write a long letter you cant blame me. The best is there are old regts passing through here almost every day on their way home. They have reenlisted for three years or during the war. That must make Johnny reb feel rather queer to think that 2 ½ years has not made our boys afraid of them nor discouraged them. I think by the first of October this wicked war will be ended. I hope & pray it may be before, for surely it is a cruel war. All my old friends has left me. John Norton & Warren has both gone off to the Hospt, so you see that I am left alone, yet I trust I am not alone for I hope the good Lord is with me. I try to live a christian life but sometimes I come far short. Last week I got a package containing a pair of mittens, no name nor any thing else, but by the looks of them, I think I can guess right where they came from & that is from you. Be I right or not, any how I am very thankful for them

-117-

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Dear Sister: The Civil War Letters of the Brothers Gould
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter 1- 1861: Charles, Wesley 1
  • Chapter 2- 1862: Charles, Wesley, James, Richard, William 11
  • Chapter 3- 1863: Wesley, James, Richard, William 51
  • Chapter 4- 1864: Wesley, James, Richard, William, George 117
  • Chapter 5- 1865: Wesley, James, Richard, William, George, Henry 149
  • Epilogue 161
  • Index 165
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