Development and Structure of the Body Image - Vol. 1

By Seymour Fisher | Go to book overview

5
Stressful Body States in Normal Persons

Existence inevitably brings with it threats to one's body--there is always the possibility of illness, disease, and injury. Numerous studies have documented the universal concern about suffering body damage. A significant component of normal "nervousness" and fearfulness has been shown to involve fears of bodily harm ( Costello, 1982; Strahan, 1974). It is common for themes of body destruction and mutilation to appear in the spontaneous verbalizations of both adults and children ( Fisher, 1970). People must learn to cope not only with actual body damage but also with its unpredictable imminence. The extreme threat represented by body dysfunction is dramatized by the fact that it is not uncommon for people to delay seeking medical consultation for somatic symptoms that are obviously serious (e.g., Andrew, 1972; Hammerschlag, Fisher, DeCosse, & Kaplan, 1964).1 In addition, there is the need to adapt to the long-term decline in the body due to aging. Stresses with direct body-image implications are a normal part of life. This chapter is devoted to cataloguing these stresses and analyzing what is known about how people defend against them. Fisher ( 1970) evaluated the pertinent literature in this area that had appeared prior to 1970. The present review considers the findings that have emerged since then. Such key questions as the following will be asked of the available data: Is the impact of body damage on the body image directly proportional to the amount of damage? Which dimensions of the body image are most sensitive to body damage and threat? What defense strategies are most commonly employed to cope with body damage? Are there significant sex differences in coping strategies?


THE THREAT OF SURGERY

It does not require much documentation that the need to undergo surgery induces serious alarm. Fisher ( 1970) reviewed a number of studies indicating disturbance incited by the prospect of surgery could be detected in conscious self-reports, in projective test responses, and in dream imagery. There was evidence that even minor surgical procedures mobilized concerns about body damage that were out of proportion to the real nature of the threat. Janis ( 1958) proposed, on the basis of a survey of surgical patients and the illness experiences of college students, that persons typified by either little or very high preoperative anxiety are those most likely to develop emotional distur

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Development and Structure of the Body Image - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 328

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.