Development and Structure of the Body Image - Vol. 1

By Seymour Fisher | Go to book overview

7
Integrative Conclusions

Major segments of the literature of body image phenomena published since 1969 have been reviewed. Although analyses of the material presented have been provided within each chapter, it would be well at this point to look back and consider larger trends. One cannot help but exclaim again about the luxuriant growth of inquiry into body image matters. Body image concepts have established outposts in all the behavioral science territories. Social psychologists particularly have shown a surge of interest in the role of the body in social interactions. Few aspects of persons' adaptations are not at least indirectly influenced by how the body domain is experienced. As already described, body image measures have been linked with an impressive list of variables and there has been much innovative fashioning of sophisticated techniques for measuring body attitudes. Recent years have seen the development of new indices diversely based on responses to lens distortions, mirror exposure, selective memory tasks, tachistoscopic input, feedback of body events, manipulation of body attention patterns, and so forth. Paul Schilder ( 1950) would be pleasantly surprised if he could witness the escalation of creative activity energized by his speculations about the "image and appearance" of the body.

The diversity of the phenomena associated with body perception is wondrous to behold. It is sensible to look for some broader integrative notions in this diversity. What kinds of generalized functions, defenses, and adaptations can one discern? Obviously, there is a basic class of body perception phenomena that pertain to monitoring such body sensations as temperature, position in space, pain, discomfort, thirst, hunger, sphincter tension, and so forth.1 Many of these sensory categories have been intensively studied, but only a few (e.g., position in space, hunger) have been seriously examined within the context of body image concepts. Much of the body image literature has focused on body experiences that lie more within a realm that is delimited by terms like identity, personality, ego defenses, and psychodynamic functions. It is true, though, that important data relevant to such terms have been obtained from the study of such dimensions as perceived body size and position in space, which, at first sight, would appear not to be promising in this respect. What major categories pertaining to body image functions and dynamics can one discern?

1. A number of studies have shown that people ascribe to their body properties that parallel the psychological impact of events they are currently

-315-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Development and Structure of the Body Image - Vol. 1
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 328

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.