The Art of James Joyce: Method and Design in Ulysses and Finnegans Wake

By A. Walton Litz | Go to book overview
Save to active project

the magic herb which saves Ulysses from Circe's magic. But are we as readers expected to discover and relate to each other the multiple equivalents enumerated on the note-sheets? Probably not. In this case, as in so many others, the detailed working-out of a 'correspondence' was primarily for Joyce's benefit, a part of the rigid discipline he had to undergo in order to control his disparate materials. Many of these detailed schemes lurk in the background of the novel, like the discarded scaffolding of a building which reflects its external form but tells us little of the essential nature. It would be a grave mistake to found any interpretation of Ulysses on Joyce schema, rather than on the human actions of Stephen, and Molly, and Mr. Leopold Bloom.


NOTES FOR SECTION I
1.
Georges Borach, Conversations with James Joyce, trans. Joseph Prescott , College English, XV ( March 1954), 325. Borach is recalling a conversation of 1 August 1917.
2.
W. B. Stanford, The Ulysses Theme, Oxford, 1954, pp. 186-87. Stanford was the first to discover that Joyce had to read the first seven chapters of Lamb Adventures of Ulysses in 1893-94 while preparing for the Intermediate Examination in English. See his useful studies of Joyce's early contact with the Odyssey in Envoy, V ( April 1951), 62-69, and The Listener, XLVI ( 19 July 1951), 99, 105. Kevin Sullivan has also examined Joyce's reading of Lamb in Joyce among the Jesuits, New York, 1958, pp. 94-98.
3.
Letters, 193. JJ to Mrs. William Murray, 10 Nov. 1922.
4.
Gorman, 45. At Belvedere College Joyce wrote an essay on Ulysses as 'My Favourite Hero'.
5.
Gorman, 176. See also Ellmann, 238-39. The versions quoted here are based upon my reading of the original letters (now in the Cornell University Library).
6.
See Richard Levin and Charles Shattuck, "First Flight to Ithaca", in James Joyce: Two Decades of Criticism, ed. Seon Givens, New York, 1948, pp. 47-94. Levin and Shattuck argue for a deliberate parallel with the Odyssey embracing all fifteen stories, but their reasoning is forced when they reach The Dead. For the date of The Dead, see Ellmann, 252ff.
7.
Ellmann, 274-75.
8.
Richard Ellmann, "The Backgrounds of Ulysses", Kenyon Review, XVI (Summer 1954), 342.
9.
Gorman, 224. It is interesting to note that when Joyce began to write Finnegans Wake, nine years later, he also started by sketching in passages which ultimately were incorporated in the work's later episodes.

-40-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Art of James Joyce: Method and Design in Ulysses and Finnegans Wake
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 152

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.