The Art of James Joyce: Method and Design in Ulysses and Finnegans Wake

By A. Walton Litz | Go to book overview

NOTES FOR SECTION III
1.
Prior to final publication Finnegans Wake was known only by the provisional title Work in Progress. For a table of composition which includes the published fragments, see Appendix C. This table should serve as an adjunct to the present chapter.
2.
The Finnegans Wake MSS. were presented to the British Museum in 1951 by Harriet Shaw Weaver. For a detailed description of this material, see Appendix A.
3.
Bruno is mentioned in "The Day of the Rabblement" ( 1901), and Joyce discussed Bruno's philosophy with his Italian teacher at University College (see The Critical Writings of James Joyce, ed. Ellsworth Mason and Richard Ellmann, New York, 1959, p. 132). In 1903 Joyce reviewed J. Lewis McIntyre's Giordano Bruno for the Dublin Daily Express ( Critical Writings, 132-34). His passionate interest in Vico's philosophy began during the Trieste years ( Gorman, 332).
4.
For Joyce's use in Finnegans Wake of legends and anecdotes familiar to his family, see Ellmann, 558; Gorman, 274; Letters, 396.
5.
There is also a hint in Ulysses of the story "How Buckley Shot the Russian General". The assassination of the Russian governor-general of Finland, General Bobrikoff, by a Finnish patriot is mentioned in the Aeolus episode (133). The event actually happened on Bloomsday ( 16 June 1904).
6.
In the Lockwood Memorial Library, University of Buffalo, there is a voluminous notebook dating from that transitional period which spans Joyce's late work on Ulysses and his preliminary efforts on the Wake (approx. 1920-25). In this notebook Joyce reviewed his earlier works and the episodes of Ulysses, apparently as a prelude to his first labours on the Wake; the notebook reveals the economy of Joyce's artistic methods, since it contains numerous entries salvaged from the composition of earlier works. The compilation of this elaborate collection of notes and summaries testifies to the reflexive nature of Joyce's art, and to the close connection between Finnegans Wake and those works which preceded it. For a brief description of the notebook, see James Joyce: sa vie, son oeuvre, son rayonnement, ed. Bernard Gheerbrant, Paris, La Hune, 1949, item 346.
7.
Letters, p. 202. For further details concerning the genesis of Finnegans Wake, see my article in Notes and Queries, CXCVIII ( October 1953), 445-47. For a discussion of the early fragments, with copious quotations, see M. J. C. Hodgart, "The Earliest Sections of Finnegans Wake", James Joyce Review, I ( February 1957), 3-18.
8.
Letters, p. 202. The early versions of these fragments are bound in at the end of British Museum Add. Ms. 47485. The fair copy and first drafts of "Tristan and Isolde" were given to Harriet Weaver by Joyce in August 1923, after she had typed the fragment for him. In July 1938 he requested a new copy of the typescript, having apparently misplaced the original ( Slocum, p. 146, item a. ix).
9.
Frank Budgen, "Joyce's Chapters of Going Forth by Day", in James Joyce: Two Decades of Criticism, ed. Seon Givens, New York, 1948, p. 347. See also Letters, 406.

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The Art of James Joyce: Method and Design in Ulysses and Finnegans Wake
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Contents xi
  • I- The Design of Ulysses 1
  • Notes for Section I 40
  • II- New Bearings 44
  • III- Work in Progress 76
  • Notes for Section III 115
  • IV- The Whole Journey 121
  • Notes for Section IV 127
  • Appendix A- Manuscripts Consulted 129
  • Appendix B- Early Vestiges of Ulysses 132
  • Notes for Appendix B 140
  • Appendix C- A Chronology of Joyce''s Work in Progress, 1914-1939 142
  • Index 151
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