Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman

By Geo. Dallas Mosgrove | Go to book overview

KENTUCKY CAVALIERS IN DIXIE.

CHAPTER I.
IN WHICH THE AUTHOR BECOMES A CONFEDERATE CAVALRYMAN-- THE MARCH FROM THE OHIO RIVER TO OWENTON--ORGANIZATION--FROM OWENTON TO CAMP BUCKNER--GENERAL BRAGG'S CAMPAIGN--BATTLE OF PERRYVILLE -- RETREAT FROM KENTUCKY.

"And there was tumult in the air,
The fife's shrill note, the drum's loud beat;
And through the wide land everywhere,
The answering tread of hurrying feet."

SIMULTANEOUSLY, September 5, 1862, General Lee invaded Maryland and General Bragg marched into Kentucky. There were exciting times in the Northland and in the Southland, and more especially in the border States. In Kentucky thousands of young men were eager to enlist under the starry cross of Dixie. The coming of Bragg opened the way. In advance of his army recruiting officers appeared here and there throughout the State, none of whom were more daring and successful than the noted trio, Giltner, Pryor and Parker, who came into Kentucky with the intention of recruiting a regiment. They operated in the border counties, along the Ohio River from Louisville to Cincinnati, and in counties adjoining them not lying immediately on the river. The result of the enterprise was the organization known as the Fourth Kentucky Cavalry Regiment. The recruits remained quietly at their homes until there was a marshaling of clans for purposes of organization. They were compelled to be very discreet in their preliminary movements, as there was ever present the menacing danger of being captured by the Federals upon information given by unfriendly citizens.

Having secretly provided themselves with arms, horses

-15-

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