Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman

By Geo. Dallas Mosgrove | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI.
LIEUTENANT-COLONEL MOSES TANDY PRYOR.

"Theirs was the glee of martial breast,
And laughter theirs at little jest;
And oft Lord Marmion deigned to aid
And mingle in the mirth they made;
For though, with men of high degree,
The proudest of the proud was he;
Yet, trained in camps, he knew the art
To win the soldier's hardy heart;
They love a captain to obey
Boisterous as March, yet fresh as May."

AS we turn back the hands on time's dial thirty years, we behold a knightly cavalier suggestive of the romantic age of chivalry. No more valorous knight e'er laid lance in rest, or more gallantly graced castle halls, challenging the admiration of fair women and brave men--a chevalier such as inspired the pen of Sir Walter Scott and the minstrel's tuneful lyre.

About thirty years old, with a tall, graceful, commanding figure, neatly attired in the uniform of a Confederate lieutenant-colonel, a clear, strong voice, and frank expression, make up the engaging personality of Colonel Tandy Pryor.

Through the instrumentality of General Wm. Nelson, early in August, 1861, the Federal Government introduced munitions of war into Kentucky, and distributed them to a class of men calling themselves "Home Guards," and, at the same time, secretly enlisted men into the Federal army, establishing a camp between Nicholasville and Danville known as "Camp Dick Robinson."

Regarding such procedure as a violation of Kentucky's assumed neutrality, the Confederates occupied Columbus, Ky., on the Mississippi River, September 3, 1861. Both Confederate and Federal partisans then actively began taking decisive positions.

A regiment of State Guards, under Colonel Roger Hanson, repaired to Camp Boone, in Northern Tennessee, and became a nucleus, around which gathered battalions and

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