Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman

By Geo. Dallas Mosgrove | Go to book overview
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CHAPTER XIX.
CAPTAIN BART W.JENKINS AND HIS TROOPERS.

"He was a stalworth knight and keen,
And had in many a battle been;
His eyebrow dark and eye of fire,
Showed spirit proud and prompt to ire;
Yet lines of thought upon his cheek,
Did deep design and counsel speak."

CAPTAIN BART JENKINS, "manly, bold and tall," generous and impulsive, was a military genius. As intimated in another chapter the victory at Limestone must be ascribed to Captain Jenkins, who suggested the strategical maneuvers, and to the dash and hard fighting of the Fourth Kentucky Cavalry.

Captain Jenkins was naturally a leader, never a follower of men. He usually managed to keep his gallant troop independent and free from entanglements with other battalions. His little command, however, was frequently attached to the Fourth Kentucky Cavalry, and his troopers were gladly received in any camp and their banner greeted with joyous acclaim on the battlefield,

For they were clansmen, bold and true,
Their chief as brave as Roderick Dhu.

Captain Jenkins, always alert and a free rover, headed his horse in the direction of the enemy's guns, often dropping into a fight unexpectedly, but at an opportune time.

Early in the war Captain Jenkins, with twenty-eight men, Nathan Parker one of them, started from Lusbys Mills, Owen County, Ky., for the Confederate lines, and overtook Giltner and Pryor at Munfordsville, where he joined forces with an officer who was recruiting the "Buckner Guards." CaptainJenkins was influential in having Pryor elected first lieutenant and Nathan Parker second lieutenant, Jenkins himself and Giltner enlisting in the "guards" as private

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