Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman

By Geo. Dallas Mosgrove | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XX.
DOCTOR SAM S. SCOTT -- ADJUTANT FREEMAN -- SERGEANT-MAJOR HARRISON -- CAPTAIN GEORGE T. ATKINS -- CAPTAIN GEORGE T. CAMPBELL -- CAPTAIN WARRIEN MONTFORT -- LIEUTENANT- COLONEL CLARENCE J. PRENTICE -- DR. GEORGE S. WHIPPLE.

DR. S. S. SCOTT.

PROBABLY no other officer of the Fourth Kentucky Cavalry or of Giltner's brigade so fully realizes that thirty years have faded away since the flag was furled at Appomattox, and that the actors in the panoramic scenes of 1861-5, who survived the unequal contest, are swiftly crossing the last river as does the regimental and brigade surgeon, Major Sam S. Scott, who is now an octogenarian--the waters of the silent river laving his feet. Major Scott was a surgeon of considerable skill, and when a battle was raging he was abreast of the front rank, attending to the wounded and alleviating the agonies of the dying.

His was a tall, rather slender and somewhat stoop-shouldered figure, clothed in a black frock coat, with a major's gilt star decorating the collar. His intellectual face wore a cynical smile. He had said that he did not intend to have his long gray hair cut until the Confederacy should have gained its independence. He coiled his hair in a knot and tied it at the base of the skull, a la the fashion adopted by the women of that time.

Doctor Scott was an educated, accomplished gentleman, and knew much of men and affairs. He was an intense Southern partisan, and being fond of adventure had been a member of the ill-starred Lopez expedition to Cuba. His thrilling description of the fate of young Crittenden and comrades made a more lasting impression upon my boyish mind than all the history I had ever read of that fateful enterprise. It was a delight to hear him talk of Theodore O'Hara, soldier and poet, author of the immortal poem, "The Bivouac of the Dead." The doctor's wife was a near kinswoman of O'Hara.

-110-

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