The Spirit and Purpose of Geography

By S. W. Wooldridge; W. Gordon East | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY

Say Lords, should not our thoughts be first of commerce? My Lord Bishop, you would recommend us agriculture?

WILLIAM BLAKE, King Edward the Third.

ECONOMIC geography so-called has its place in syllabuses of geography and is not unfamiliar to the layman. At first sight its content and purpose are self-evident, once it is grasped that geography is concerned not merely with the position of places and the shapes of countries, but also with man and his works in so far as they are related in place. Production and trade in all their manifold aspects are not only in some sense facts of geography, but they reflect in striking fashion the geographical differentiation of the surface of the earth. Here, by common consent, is a branch of our subject both important and useful, and the existence of a wide and growing range of texts, bearing the comprehensive title "economic geography," would appear to characterize clearly its field. Let us glance briefly at some of these to see what is currently accepted before turning to certain difficulties and ambiguities which invite discussion, since these are not merely points of nomenclature, but must affect our thinking over the whole field of geography.

The term "economic geography" appears to have been first used in 1882 by the German Gotz to distinguish his work from "Commercial Geography" which had the earlier start. This latter raises no special problems: its purpose is frankly practical rather than philosophical, scientific or educational in the wider sense. Commercial geography presents summaries, periodically brought up to date, of the production and trade of the principal commodities of the world, set against its variegated geographical background. Rarely does it essay more

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Spirit and Purpose of Geography
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 178

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.