The Spirit and Purpose of Geography

By S. W. Wooldridge; W. Gordon East | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY

"Don't start that hare! God knows where it might lead us!" Cited by Y. M. GOBLET, The Twilight of Treaties ( 1936).

WITH these words a European delegate at the International Geography Congress at Paris in 1931 reacted to the proposal that a section dealing with political geography should be created to function at subsequent meetings. Doubtless his fear of the possible corruption of academic geography by such an innovation is easily explicable in terms of the circumstances of the time. The first world war had undermined the European states system and, in its effects, recast the political map. Old empires had dissolved; new national states had emerged. As Count Keyserling decribed it, Europe had become "an astoundingly manifold, astoundingly riven structure; the Balkans constitute its truest prototype."

The small area of Europe, equivalent to one-twelfth of the earth's land surface, had come to contain uneasily within its bounds three-fifths of the independent states of the world, and these were enclosed within no less than 17,000 miles of boundary (the comparable figure in 1914 was 13,000), or one- sixth of the world total. Moreover, it was then a fresh recollection in the minds of geographers who had taken part at, or watched the activities of, the Paris Peace Conference that not only had geography played there a sober and scientific part in the examination of boundary problems but had been misused by those whose prime concern was the advancement of particular territorial aspirations. The maps produced at the Paris Conference, though for the most part the result of careful expert study, included others the authenticity of which was at the least suspect.

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Spirit and Purpose of Geography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • List of Sketch Maps 9
  • Preface 11
  • Chapter I - The Nature and Development Of Geography 13
  • Chapter II - The Philosophy and Purpose Of Geography 25
  • Chapter III - Physical Geography And Biogeography 39
  • Chapter IV - Geography and Maps 64
  • Chapter V - Historical Geography 80
  • Chapter VI - Economic Geography 103
  • Chapter VII - Political Geography 121
  • Chapter VIII - Regional Geography and The Theory of Regions 140
  • Chapter IX - Conclusion 161
  • Note on Reading 167
  • Index 171
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 178

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.