Contemporary Black American Playwrights and Their Plays: A Biographical Directory and Dramatic Index

By Bernard L. Peterson Jr. | Go to book overview

O

OAKLEY, G. WILLIAM, Playwright and director. Based in New York City.


DRAMATIC WORK:

Basin Street Orig. title: Storyville (musical, 2 acts, pre-1983). Book coauthored with Michael Hulett, who also wrote the lyrics. Music by Turk Thom Bridwell. Jazz-blues musical, set in the Storyville district of New Orleans in 1917. Prod. under its present title by the New Federal Theatre, New York, Sept. 8-25, 1983; dir. by Oakley. Unpub. script entitled Storyville in the Hatch-Billops Collection.

O'NEAL, JOHN ( 1940-), Theatrical director, civil rights organizer, playwright, poet, and essayist. Born in Mount City, IL. Currently residing in New Orleans, LA. Educated at Southern Illinois Univ. (B.A., 1962). Married; father of two children. Former field secretary, SNCC, 1962-65. Field program director, Commission for Racial Justice, United Church of Christ, 1966-68. Founder and producing director, Free Southern Theatre (FST), based in New Orleans, 1963- c. 1965. Contributing author to Black World Magazine and coeditor of The Free Southern Theatre by the Free Southern Theatre ( 1969). Address: 1307 Barracks St., New Orleans, LA 70115.


PLAYS AND DRAMATIC WORKS:

Black Power, Green Power, Red in the Eye (melodrama, 1972). A close look at the sorry situation that exists in the games played on black folk by some of the current crop of black politicians.

Where Is the Blood of Your Fathers (stage doc., 1973). Written by the FST Workshop. Edited by O'Neal and * Ben Spillman. An examination of the role that black people played in the pre-Civil War South. The question is: Did black folk sit idly by waiting for Massa Lincoln to set them free? Prod. by FST, Summer 1973, for 18 perfs. Prod. at Memphis State Univ., Winter 1974; and at Florida A. & M. Univ., Spring 1975.

Hurricane Season (drama, 1973). Examination of the impact of the unprincipled use of computer technology on the life and family of a New Orleans black dock worker.

-361-

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Contemporary Black American Playwrights and Their Plays: A Biographical Directory and Dramatic Index
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Preface xv
  • Abbreviations xxi
  • Symbols xxv
  • A Biographical Directory xxvii
  • A 1
  • B 29
  • C 93
  • D 127
  • E 157
  • F 169
  • G 187
  • I 261
  • J 263
  • K 285
  • L 299
  • N 357
  • O 361
  • P 371
  • S 409
  • T 441
  • U-V 459
  • W 465
  • Y 513
  • Z 517
  • Appendex a Additional Playwrights Whose Scripts Are Located in Special Repositories 519
  • Appendix B Other Contemporary Black American Playwrights 525
  • Information Sources 531
  • Title Index 551
  • General Index 593
  • About the Author 627
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