Flawed Giant: Lyndon Johnson and His Times, 1961-1973

By Robert Dallek | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This second volume on Lyndon Johnson's life completes fourteen years of work on the man and his times. As with Lone Star Rising, this book is a collaborative effort of the author with participants in the administration, archivists, other scholars, journalists, editors, my family members, and personal friends.

The Lyndon B. Johnson Library in Austin, Texas, is a model of what a presidential library should be: an even-handed facilitator of scholarship on LBJ and his presidency. The tone is set by Harry Middleton, the library's director, who has devoted the last twenty- five years to opening the vast collection of manuscripts and now tape recordings for use by anyone with an interest in studying Johnson and his times.

Others at the library have been equally forthcoming: I am indebted to Tina Houston, the archivist, Charles Corkran, Allen Fisher, Kathy Frankum, Regina Greenwell, David Humphrey, Michael Parrish, Lawrence Reed, E. Philip Scott, Robert Tissinger, John Wilson, and Gary Yarrington for their help. Four others at the library earned my special appreciation. Linda Hanson answered my requests for materials and my many questions with unfailing good humor and made access to the millions of documents in the library a feasible enterprise. Claudia Anderson, Mary Knill, and Ted Gittinger were more than helpmates in climbing the mountains of paper records and oral histories; they are dear friends who made my visits to the library more a pleasure than a chore.

Robert Divine, James Galbraith, Lewis L. Gould, Dagmar and Robert Hamilton, Sanford Levinson, and Thomas D. Russell at the University of Texas endured my ramblings about LBJ and made wise suggestions which in one way or another were incorporated into this second volume.

I am indebted to the numerous people who agreed to share their recollections of LBJ with me, including Lady Bird Johnson, McGeorge Bundy, William P. Bundy, George Christian, Murray Fromson, Robert Hardesty, Nicholas Katzenbach, Robert McNamara, Harry Mid

-xiii-

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Flawed Giant: Lyndon Johnson and His Times, 1961-1973
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - The Most Insignificant Office 3
  • 2 - From JFK to Lbj 54
  • 3 - Landslide Lyndon 122
  • 4 - King of the Hill 185
  • 5 - Foreign Policy Dilemmas 238
  • 6 - Retreat from the Great Society 293
  • 7 - Lyndon Johnson's War, 340
  • 8 - A Sea of Troubles 391
  • 9 - Stalemate 443
  • 10 - Last Hurrahs 494
  • 11 - Unfinished Business 550
  • 12 - After the Fall 601
  • Afterword 624
  • Sources 629
  • Abbreviations Used in Notes 645
  • Notes 647
  • Index 737
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