Greek Ethical Thought from Homer to the Stoics

By Hilda D. Oakeley | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
PAGE
INTRODUCTIONvii
HOMER
THE ILIAD--
Home Affection. Hector's Farewell to Andromache and Astyanax. VI. 3941
Noblesse Oblige. Sarpedon and Glaucus. XII. 3024
The Sacredness of the Suppliant. Achilles and Priam. XXIV. 4776
Destiny. Achilles and his Horse Xanthus. XIX. 397 8
THE ODYSSEY--
Welcome for the Stranger and Suppliant. Odysseus at the Palace of Alcinous. VII. 159 9
Some God may come in the Likeness of a suppliant Beggar. Odysseus as an aged Beggar. XVII. 481 10
Father and Son. Odysseus and Laertes. XXIV. 231, 314 10
HESIOD
Praise of the Mean Life. Works and Days 40 12
Justice brings Prosperity. Works and Days 220-285 12
THEOGNIS
Evil brings Retribution. 197-20815
Why do the Innocent suffer for the Guilty? 729-75015
Nature and Nurture. 42916
SIMONIDES
The Athenian Dead at Plataea17
The Lacedaemonian Dead at Plataea17
The Spartans who fell at Thermopylae17
BACCHYLIDES
The glory of Virtue. Odes of Victory I. 48-7418
Many Paths to Renown. Odes of Victory III. 35-5218
AESCHYLUS
Truth comes by Suffering. Agamemnon 176, 25020
Unrighteousness punished. Agamemnon 46321
Only the Just blest. Agamemnon 75121
Measure in Prosperity safest. Agamemnon 100122

-xxxix-

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